Preparing for your appointment

By Mayo Clinic Staff

If you have signs or symptoms common to cystitis, make an appointment with your primary care provider. After an initial evaluation, you may be referred to a doctor who specializes in urinary tract disorders (urologist or nephrologist).

Because appointments can be brief, and there's often a lot to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared.

What you can do

  • Ask if there's anything you need to do before your appointment, such as collect a urine specimen.
  • Write down your symptoms, including any that seem unrelated to cystitis.
  • Make a list of all the medications, vitamins or other supplements that you take.
  • Take a family member or friend along, if possible. Sometimes it can be hard to remember all the information, and a relative or friend may hear something that you missed or forgot.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

For cystitis, basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What is the most likely cause of my signs and symptoms?
  • Are there any other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests to confirm the diagnosis?
  • What factors do you think may have contributed to my cystitis?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • If the first treatment doesn't work, what will you recommend next?
  • Am I at risk of complications from this condition?
  • What is the risk that this problem will recur?
  • What steps can I take to reduce my risk of a recurrence?
  • Should I see a specialist?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment at any time when you don't understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • When did you first notice your symptoms?
  • Have you been treated for a bladder or kidney infection in the past?
  • How severe is your discomfort?
  • How frequently do you urinate?
  • Are your symptoms relieved by urinating?
  • Do you have low back pain?
  • Have you had a fever?
  • Have you noticed vaginal discharge or blood in your urine?
  • Are you sexually active?
  • Do you use contraception? What kind?
  • Could you be pregnant?
  • Are you being treated for any other medical conditions?
  • Have you ever used a catheter?
  • What medications are you currently taking, including over-the-counter and prescription drugs as well as vitamins and supplements?
Apr. 25, 2012

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