Overview

Chronic pelvic pain is pain in the area below your bellybutton and between your hips that lasts six months or longer.

Chronic pelvic pain can have multiple causes. It can be a symptom of another disease, or it can be a condition in its own right.

If your chronic pelvic pain appears to be caused by another medical problem, treating that problem may be enough to eliminate your pain.

However, in many cases it's not possible to identify a single cause for chronic pelvic pain. In that case, the goal of treatment is to reduce your pain and other symptoms and improve your quality of life.

July 06, 2016
References
  1. Howard F. Causes of chronic pelvic pain in women. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  2. Howard F. Treatment of chronic pelvic pain in women. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic pain. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  4. Elkadry E, et al Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of myofascial pelvic pain syndrome in women. Evaluation of chronic pelvic pain in women. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  5. Frequently asked questions. Gynecologic problems FAQ099. Chronic pelvic pain. American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq099.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20130418T1809515975. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  6. Howard F. Evaluation of chronic pelvic pain in women. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  7. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/interstitialcystitis/index.htm. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  8. Carinci AJ. Complementary and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain. Current Pain and Headache Reports. 2013;17:316.
  9. Cheong YC, et al. Non-surgical interventions for the management of chronic pelvic pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD008797.pub2/abstract. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  10. Relaxation techniques for health: An introduction. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. http://nccam.nih.gov/sites/nccam.nih.gov/files/relaxation_introduction.pdf.Accessed April 8, 2016.
  11. AskMayoExpert. Endometriosis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  12. Endometriosis. Womenshealth.gov. http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/endometriosis.html. Accessed April 12, 2016.
  13. AskMayoExpert. Painful bladder syndrome. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  14. Kotarinos RK. Pelvic floor physical therapy for management of myofascial pelvic pain syndrome in women. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  15. Hunter C, et al. Neuromodulation of pelvic visceral pain: Review of the literature and case series of potential novel targets for treatment. Pain Practice. 2013;13:3.
  16. Acupuncture: In-depth. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/acupuncture/introduction. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  17. Speer LM, et al. Chronic pelvic pain in women. American Family Physician. 2016;93:380.
  18. Engeler D, et al. Guidelines on chronic pelvic pain. European Association of Urology. http://uroweb.org/wp-content/uploads/EAU-Guidelines-Chronic-Pelvic-Pain-2015.pdf. Accessed April 13, 2016.