Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

In addition to medical treatment and prescription medications, these self-help measures may reduce your symptoms and your mouth discomfort:

  • Drink plenty of fluids to help ease the feeling of dry mouth, or suck on ice chips
  • Avoid acidic foods and liquids, such as tomatoes, orange juice, carbonated beverages and coffee
  • Avoid alcohol and products with alcohol, as they may irritate the lining of your mouth
  • Don't use tobacco products
  • Avoid spicy-hot foods
  • Avoid products with cinnamon or mint
  • Try different mild or flavor-free brands of toothpaste, such as one for sensitive teeth or one without mint or cinnamon
  • Take steps to reduce stress

Coping and support

Burning mouth syndrome can be uncomfortable and frustrating. It can reduce your quality of life if you don't take steps to stay positive and hopeful.

Consider some of these techniques to help cope with the chronic discomfort of burning mouth syndrome:

  • Practice relaxation exercises, such as yoga
  • Engage in pleasurable activities, such as physical activities or hobbies, especially when you feel anxious
  • Try to stay socially active by connecting with understanding family and friends
  • Join a chronic pain support group

Prevention

There's no known way to prevent burning mouth syndrome. But by avoiding tobacco, acidic foods, spicy foods and carbonated beverages, and excessive stress, you may be able to reduce the discomfort from burning mouth syndrome or prevent your discomfort from getting worse.

Feb. 02, 2016
References
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  4. Burning mouth syndrome. National Organization for Rare Disorders. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/burning-mouth-syndrome/. Accessed Dec. 15, 2015.
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