Treatment

Depending on the condition causing your hematuria, treatment might involve taking antibiotics to clear a urinary tract infection, trying a prescription medication to shrink an enlarged prostate or having shock wave therapy to break up bladder or kidney stones. In some cases, no treatment is necessary.

Be sure to follow up with your doctor after treatment to ensure there's no more blood in your urine.

Aug. 17, 2017
References
  1. Kurtz M, et al. Etiology and evaluation of hematuria in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  2. Hematuria (Blood in the urine). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/hematuria-blood-urine. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  3. Hematuria in adults. National Kidney Foundation. https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/hematuria-adults. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  4. Isolated hematuria. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/genitourinary-disorders/symptoms-of-genitourinary-disorders/isolated-hematuria. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  5. Medical student curriculum: Hematuria. American Urological Association. http://www.auanet.org/education/educational-programs/medical-student-education/medical-student-curriculum/hematuria. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  6. Mercieri A. Exercise-induced hematuria. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  7. Wein AJ, et al., eds. Evaluation of the urologic patient: History, physical examination, and urinalysis. In: Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 10, 2017.