ALS care at Mayo Clinic

  • Your Mayo Clinic care team. Mayo Clinic doctors trained in neuromuscular conditions (neurologists) work closely with doctors trained in physical medicine and rehabilitation (physiatrists), physical and occupational therapists, nutrition specialists (dietitians), nurses, social workers, and others to care for people with ALS. Many Mayo Clinic health care professionals are ready and willing to join your team.

    Mayo Clinic doctors diagnose and treat more than 800 people with ALS each year.

  • Advanced diagnosis and treatment. Mayo Clinic doctors have state-of-the-art equipment to run diagnostic tests such as electromyograms and nerve conduction studies to provide an accurate diagnosis and guide treatment.
  • Comprehensive care. The Mayo Clinic comprehensive ALS care team coordinates to ensure that all of your treatment needs, including rehabilitation, nutrition, and lung and breathing care, are met with satisfaction. Doctors offer treatment and continuing care that can address your medical needs and improve your quality of life.
  • Support. The integrated care team can help improve your quality of life and provide needed support for you and your family. Your care team can also help connect you with support groups in your area.
  • Nationally recognized expertise. Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are certified Centers of Excellence by the ALS Association.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's neurology department's expertise and rankings.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report.

Sept. 22, 2016
References
  1. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/amyotrophiclateralsclerosis/ALS.htm. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  2. Elman LB. Clinical features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other forms of motor neuron disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  3. Maragakis NJ. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  4. McCluskey L. Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  5. Ingre C, et al. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Clinical Epidemiology. 2015;7:181.
  6. Crum BA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 25, 2016.
  7. Galvez-Jimenez N. Symptom-based management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  8. Elman LB, et al. Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other forms of motor neuron disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  9. Miller RG, et al. Practice parameter update: The care of the patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Multidisciplinary care, symptom management, and cognitive/behavioral impairment (an evidence-based review): Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology. 2009;73:1227.
  10. Neurological diagnostic tests and procedures. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/misc/diagnostic_tests.htm. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  11. Choudry RB, et al. Disease modifying treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  12. ALS Association chapter support groups. The ALS Association. , http://www.alsa.org/community/support-groups/. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  13. Services in your community. The ALS Association. http://www.alsa.org/community/certified-centers/. Accessed July 12, 2016.
  14. Riggin ER. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 10, 2016.