Treatment

In most cases, you can treat shin splints with simple self-care steps:

  • Rest. Avoid activities that cause pain, swelling or discomfort — but don't give up all physical activity. While you're healing, try low-impact exercises, such as swimming, bicycling or water running.
  • Ice. Apply ice packs to the affected shin for 15 to 20 minutes at a time, four to eight times a day for several days. To protect your skin, wrap the ice packs in a thin towel.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. Try ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others), naproxen sodium (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) to reduce pain.

Resume your usual activities gradually after your pain is gone.

July 21, 2016
References
  1. Shin splints. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00407. Accessed June 30, 2016.
  2. Shin splints. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/injuries-poisoning/sports-injury/shin-splints. Accessed June 30, 2016.
  3. Callahan LR. Overview of running injuries of the lower extremity. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 30, 2016.
  4. Safran MR, et al. Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints). In: Instructions for Sports Medicine Patients. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2012. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 30, 2016.
  5. Laskowski ER (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 1, 2016.