Why it's done

Most often, prostatectomy is done to treat localized prostate cancer. It may be used alone, or in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Prostatectomy to treat prostate cancer involves removing the entire prostate, seminal vesicles and some surrounding tissue, including lymph nodes.

Prostatectomy options to treat prostate cancer include open radical prostatectomy, laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

Less often, simple prostatectomy may also be used to treat a blocked urethra caused by BPH. Simple prostatectomy to treat BPH doesn't always involve removing the entire prostate. The surgery eases urinary symptoms and complications resulting from blocked urine flow, including:

  • A frequent, urgent need to urinate
  • Difficulty starting urination
  • Slow (prolonged) urination
  • Increased urination frequency at night (nocturia)
  • Stopping and starting again while urinating
  • The feeling you can't completely empty your bladder
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Inability to urinate

Simple prostatectomy carries a higher risk of complications and typically results in a longer recovery time than other procedures to treat BPH.

Mayo Clinic urologists use advanced endoscopic techniques to address these symptoms without incisions in most cases.

A doctor consulting with a patient. Explaining prostatectomy options

A Mayo Clinic urologist discusses prostatectomy options with a patient.

Your surgical team will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each technique, as well as your preferences, to determine which approach is best for you.

July 25, 2017
References
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