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Displaying 1-1 out of 1 doctors available

Last Name Initial: H

  1. Brian W. Hardaway, M.D.

    Brian W. Hardaway, M.D.

    1. Cardiologist
    1. Phoenix, AZ
    Areas of focus:

    Mechanical circulatory support device implantation, Heart transplant, Heart failure

Research

Mayo Clinic researchers in the Transplant Center conduct ongoing studies and clinical trials in improving surgical procedures, improving outcomes and caring for people who need transplants. Researchers also study alternative therapies for people who might be able to use an alternative to a heart transplant.

Areas of research include:

  • Cardiac regenerative therapies in cardiac regeneration research
  • Genetics and potential treatments for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare congenital heart defect
  • Biomarkers and genetics to individualize therapy
  • New or improved surgical procedures
  • Selecting and treating heart transplant recipients
  • Therapeutic approaches to prolong graft survival
  • Managing immunosuppressive medications after transplant
  • New immunosuppressant medications
  • Outcomes after heart transplants
  • Blood test to monitor for rejection
  • Ventricular assist devices
  • Alternative therapies for people who may not need heart transplants
  • Wellness coaching for caregivers and transplant recipients
  • Transplanting living organs from one species to another (xenotransplantation)
  • Gene therapy

Publications

See a list of publications about heart transplant by Mayo Clinic doctors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Research Profiles

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View all physicians • Arizona

Heart transplant care at Mayo Clinic

May 11, 2022
  1. Heart transplant. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/heart-transplant. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  2. Guglin M, et al. Evaluation for heart transplantation and LVAD implantation: JACC Council perspectives. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2020; doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2020.01.034.
  3. Heart transplant. American Heart Association. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/congenital-heart-defects/care-and-treatment-for-congenital-heart-defects/heart-transplant. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  4. Heart. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/organ-datasource/heart/. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  5. Getting a new heart: Information for patients about heart transplant. American Society of Transplantation. https://www.myast.org/patient-information/patient-education-packets. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  6. Medicines to keep your new organ healthy. American Society of Transplantation. https://www.myast.org/patient-information/patient-education-packets. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  7. Bhagra SK, et al. Cardiac transplantation: Indications, eligibility and current outcomes. Heart. 2019; doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2018-313103.
  8. Matching donors and recipients. Health Resources & Services Administration. https://www.organdonor.gov/learn/process/matching. Accessed Aug. 9, 2021.
  9. Freeman R, et al. Cardiac transplant postoperative management and care. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly. 2016; doi:10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000116.
  10. Neethling E, et al. Intraoperative and early postoperative management of heart transplantation: Anesthetic implications. Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. 2020; doi:10.1053/j.jvca.2019.09.037.
  11. Yardley M, et al. Importance of physical capacity and the effects of exercise in heart transplant recipients. World Journal of Transplantation. 2018; doi:10.5500/wjt.v8.i1.1.
  12. Entwistle TR, et al. Modifying dietary patterns in cardiothoracic transplant patients to reduce cardiovascular risk: The AMEND-IT Trial. Clinical Transplantation. 2021; doi:10.1111/ctr.14186.
  13. Uithoven KE, et al. The role of cardiac rehabilitation in reducing major adverse cardiac events in heart transplantation patients. Journal of Cardiac Failure. 2020; doi:10.1016/j.cardfail.2020.01.011.
  14. Colvin M, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2019 Annual Data Report: Heart. American Journal of Transplantation. 2021; doi:10.1111/ajt.16492.
  15. Benefits of physical activity. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/pa-health/index.htm. Accessed Aug. 16, 2021.
  16. Bui QM, et al. Psychosocial evaluation of candidates for heart transplant and ventricular assist devices. Circulation: Heart failure. 2019; doi:10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.119.006058.
  17. Total artificial heart. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/total-artificial-heart. Accessed Aug. 16, 2021.
  18. D'Addese L, et al. Pediatric heart transplantation in the current era. Current Opinion in Pediatrics. 2019; doi:10.1097/MOP.0000000000000805.
  19. Office of Patient Education. Nutrition guidelines for transplant recipients. Mayo Clinic; 2019.
  20. Dingli D (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic. Sept. 9, 2021.
  21. Organ facts and surgeries: Heart. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. https://transplantliving.org/organ-facts/heart/. Accessed Sept. 10, 2021.

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