Know what's in your food

Eat foods that contain only ingredients that you can easily identify and foods with just a few ingredients. Eating more "real food" will help you cut out processed food, such as chips, cookies and frozen meals.

You will naturally choose fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean protein sources, and healthy fats. These foods are high in nutrients, but it's important to keep portion control in check when it comes to foods in the protein and fat groups, since they tend to be high in calories.

Be politely picky at restaurants

Most restaurants serve large portion sizes, loaded with salt and fat. To keep from overeating, request a to-go box right when your meal is served and save half for the next day. That way, you won't be tempted to eat more than you really want or need.

Ask your server how foods are prepared and choose menu items that are baked, broiled, roasted, seared, poached or steamed. Also make sure to ask for sauces or dressings on the side, and look for vegetables or fruit as side options instead of french fries.

Practice mindful eating

Mindfulness is a form of meditation that involves focusing intently on the present — what you're feeling or sensing in each moment, even while eating.

The practice of mindful eating allows you to slow down and savor your food, which can help prevent overeating. How? It takes up to 20 minutes for your brain to register the chemicals that let you know when you are no longer hungry. Slowing down helps your brain catch up to how full you're feeling.

Take a moment before eating and think of the food you are about to eat as fuel for your body. Remind yourself that you would like to feel satisfied, not stuffed.

Dec. 08, 2016 See more In-depth