Diagnosis and treatment

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

U.S. patients

Online requests

Telephone requests

Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Arizona

Central Appointment Office

  1. 800-446-2279 (toll-free)
  2. 480-301-7683 (TDD service for hearing impaired)
  3. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  4. Mountain time
  5. Monday through Friday
Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida

Central Appointment Office

  1. 904-953-0853
  2. 904-953-2300 (TDD service for hearing impaired)
  3. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  4. Eastern time
  5. Monday through Friday
Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota

Central Appointment Office

  1. 507-538-3270
  2. 507-281-9786 (TDD service for hearing impaired)
  3. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  4. Central time
  5. Monday through Friday
Mayo Clinic Children's Center

Central Appointment Office
(Minnesota)

  1. 855-MAYO-KID (855-629-6543, toll-free)
  2. 507-281-9786 (TDD service for hearing impaired)
  3. 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  4. Central time
  5. Monday through Friday

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care like they've never experienced. See the stories of satisfied Mayo Clinic patients.

Mayo Clinic has one of the largest and most experienced practices in the United States, with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. Staff skilled in dozens of specialties work together to ensure quality care and successful recovery.

Mayo Clinic doctors have extensive experience diagnosing and treating solitary fibrous tumors. Because solitary fibrous tumors are rare, not all doctors are experienced in treating them.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, which recognizes scientific excellence and a multidisciplinary approach to cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for cancer by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic has major campuses in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona; Jacksonville, Florida; and Rochester, Minnesota. The Mayo Clinic Health System has dozens of locations in several states.

For more information on visiting Mayo Clinic, choose your location below:

Mayo Clinic doctors and scientists are studying new ways to diagnose and treat solitary fibrous tumors.

Cancer research is conducted in coordination with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center receives funding from the National Cancer Institute and is designated as a comprehensive cancer center — recognition for an institution's scientific excellence and multidisciplinary resources focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic authors on solitary fibrous tumors on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people.

In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals, or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

Learn more about appointments at Mayo Clinic.

Please contact your insurance company to verify medical coverage and to obtain any needed authorization prior to your visit. Often, your insurer's customer service number is printed on the back of your insurance card.

Aug. 11, 2017
References
  1. Folpe AL, et al. Tumor of perivascular cells. In: Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2010.
  2. Demicco EG, et al. Solitary fibrous tumor. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 27, 2016.
  3. Jakob M. Malignant solitary fibrous tumor involving the liver. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2013;19:3354.
  4. Keraliya AR, et al. Solitary fibrous tumors — 2016 imaging update. Radiologic Clinics of North America. 2016;54:565.
  5. Demicco EG, et al. Solitary fibrous tumor: A clinicopathological study of 110 cases and proposed risk assessment model. Modern Pathology. 2012;25:1298.
  6. Devito N, et al. Clinical characteristics and outcomes for solitary fibrous tumor (SFT): A single center experience. PLoS One. 2015;10:1.
  7. Levard A, et al. Outcome of patients with advanced solitary fibrous tumors: The Centre Léon Bérard experience. BMC Cancer. 2013;13:109.