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May 19, 2017
References
  1. Brunicardi FC, et al., eds. Orthopedic surgery. In: Schwartz's Principles of Surgery. 10th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 10, 2016.
  2. Sprains, strains and fractures. American Podiatric Medical Association. http://www.apma.org/Learn/FootHealth.cfm?ItemNumber=982. Accessed Dec. 17, 2016.
  3. Ankle fractures (broken ankle). American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00391. Accessed Dec. 10, 2016.
  4. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00379. Accessed Dec. 10, 2016.
  5. Toe and forefoot fractures. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00165. Accessed Dec. 11, 2016.
  6. Tintinalli JE, et al. Foot injuries. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw Hill Companies; 2016. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Dec. 10, 2016.
  7. Stress fracture. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society. http://www.aofas.org/footcaremd/conditions/ailments-of-the-midfoot/pages/stress-fractures.aspx?PF=1. Accessed Dec. 17, 2016.
  8. Once is enough: A guide to preventing future fractures. NIH Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases National Resource Center. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Osteoporosis/Fracture/. Accessed Dec. 10, 2016.

Broken ankle/broken foot