Tradition & Heritage Timeline Artifacts  
Dr. Plummer and other Mayo Clinic Colleagues
Dr. Louis Wilson
Dr. Louis Wilson

On Jan. 1, 1905, Dr. Louis B. Wilson joined Mayo Clinic to organize and develop the pathologic, clinical, and experimental laboratories. Under his direction, laboratory work began in clinical pathology, gastric analysis, general pathology, bacteriology, experimental surgery, biochemistry, photography, and the necropsy service.

Shortly after Dr. Wilson's arrival, a laboratory room near the operating rooms at Saint Marys Hospital was fitted for pathologic and bacteriologic work. A room in the hospital's basement was designated for necropsies. When Dr. Wilson decided to add a new barn to his land, he offered to include space there for additional research if the Doctors Mayo would contribute $500 toward building of the structure. The brothers agreed and by 1908 six rooms in Dr. Wilson's barn were equipped for experimental surgery.

Dr. Wilson hired Dr. Frank Mann, who was given charge of the barn. Dr. Wilson became the father of research in Rochester, and at the same time, made significant contributions to the practice of medicine. He developed the fresh frozen tissue method for pathological diagnosis in surgery.

The erection of the 1914 Building helped to centralize and provide adequate space for the growing laboratories. In 1915, Dr. Wilson was appointed to the newly created position of Director of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

By 1919, patient requirements began increasing the need for additional laboratory facilities. By 1925, there were 135 rooms used exclusively for laboratories, with a staff of 263, of whom 66 were physicians or other professionals.

Cora Olson Russell Drake
Dr. Louis B. Wilson
Dr. Louis B. Wilson
Dr. Wilson with microscope
Dr. Wilson with microscope

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