About six to eight weeks after surgery, your doctor will examine your semen under a microscope to see if the operation was successful.

Your doctor may want to check your semen periodically. Unless you get your partner pregnant, checking your semen for sperm is the only way to tell if your vasectomy reversal was a success.

When a vasectomy reversal is successful, sperm usually appear in the semen after a few months, but it can sometimes take a year or more. The likelihood of achieving pregnancy depends on various factors, including the length of time that passed since the vasectomy and the female partner's age.

If the vasectomy reversal doesn't work

Vasectomy reversals sometimes fail if there is an underlying issue with the testicle, which cannot be recognized during surgery, or if a blockage develops sometime after surgery. Some men have a second-attempt vasectomy reversal surgery if the procedure doesn't work the first time.

You may also be able to father a child through in vitro fertilization by using frozen sperm retrieved during a semen analysis during your vasectomy reversal. If you didn't have sperm frozen or you do not have any sperm in your ejaculate, in vitro fertilization may still be possible using sperm retrieved directly from your testicle or epididymis.

How can I find out my predicted success rate?

There are many factors that contribute to a successful outcome. To receive an estimate of your anticipated success rate, please email and request a questionnaire.

Once your responses are received, they will be compared to a database of success rates to give you estimates of the chance of return of any sperm, sperm counts considered within "normal" range, pregnancy rate and risks of later failure after an initial success. It typically takes 1 to 2 business days to receive an email back once you submit the form.

March 11, 2016
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