What you can expect

You'll be given a local anesthetic to numb the prostate area. The anesthetic might be inserted through the tip of your penis, or given in a shot via your rectum or in the area between your scrotum and anus.

You might also have intravenous (IV) sedation. With IV sedation, you'll be drowsy but remain conscious during the procedure.

During the procedure

Using the scope, your doctor will insert small needles into your prostate. You might feel a little pain or discomfort when the radio waves pass through the needles to heat and destroy prostate tissue.

After the procedure

You will likely have a urinary catheter in place because of swelling that blocks urine flow. The catheter is generally removed after one to three days. You will likely need to take antibiotics to prevent a urinary tract infection.

You might notice:

  • Blood in your urine. This shouldn't last for more than a few days.
  • Irritating urinary symptoms. You might feel an urgent or frequent need to urinate, or you might have to get up more often during the night to urinate. Most men experience burning, especially at the tips of their penises and as they finish urinating. These symptoms generally last about a week.
  • Difficulty holding urine. Incontinence can occur because your bladder is used to having to push urine through a urethra narrowed by enlarged prostate tissue. For most men, this issue improves with time.
  • Urinary tract infection. Urinary tract infections are a possible complication after any enlarged prostate procedure. The risk of infection increases the longer you have a catheter in place. Some men have recurring urinary tract infections after TUNA.