Surgery for prostate cancer involves removing the prostate gland (prostatectomy). Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy uses a computer-enhanced robotic system to remove the prostate gland and surrounding lymph nodes through small abdominal incisions. The robotic system allows smaller and more-precise incisions, which for some people promotes faster recovery than traditional open surgery does. Most people who are candidates for traditional open or laparoscopic prostatectomy are also candidates for robotic prostatectomy.

About

During robotic prostatectomy, your surgeon sits at a remote control console a short distance from you and the operating table and precisely controls the motion of the surgical instruments using two hand-and-finger control devices. The console displays a magnified, 3-D view of the surgical area that enables the surgeon to visualize the procedure in much greater detail than in traditional laparoscopic surgery.

The surgeon can make incisions with great precision, which often leads to fast healing. The robotic approach also enables nerve-sparing techniques that may preserve both sexual potency and continence in the appropriately selected person.

Robotic prostatectomy can result in reduced pain and blood loss, reduced tissue trauma, a shorter hospital stay, and a quicker recovery period than a traditional prostatectomy. You usually can return to normal activity, with minor restrictions, two to four weeks after surgery.

  • Expertise and experience. Mayo Clinic's prostate care team has surgeons on all three campuses who have many years of experience in prostate treatment in general, and robotic prostatectomy surgery in particular. Mayo surgeons pioneered the use of robotic prostatectomy surgery and have been performing this surgery successfully since 2001. Mayo surgeons complete about 1,200 prostatectomies each year.
  • Multispecialty team and dedicated facility. Mayo Clinic's multispecialty team and a dedicated facility for robotic prostatectomy allow surgeons to provide the highest level of care possible for people undergoing this procedure.
  • Advanced technology and staffing. Surgeons at Mayo Clinic use state-of-the-art equipment, including instruments, associated technology and the robotic system itself. An experienced team performs the surgeries, working together to ensure both positive outcomes and a safe environment.
  • Comprehensive cancer center. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, recognizing scientific excellence and a multispecialty approach focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for urology by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked high performing for urology by U.S. News & World Report.

At Mayo Clinic, we assemble a team of specialists who take the time to listen and thoroughly understand your health issues and concerns. We tailor the care you receive to your personal health care needs. You can trust our specialists to collaborate and offer you the best possible outcomes, safety and service.

Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit medical institution that reinvests all earnings into improving medical practice, research and education. We're constantly involved in innovation and medical research, finding solutions to improve your care and quality of life. Your doctor or someone on your medical team is likely involved in research related to your condition.

Our patients tell us that the quality of their interactions, our attention to detail and the efficiency of their visits mean health care — and trusted answers — like they've never experienced.

Why Choose Mayo Clinic

What Sets Mayo Clinic Apart

Mayo Clinic works with hundreds of insurance companies and is an in-network provider for millions of people. In most cases, Mayo Clinic doesn't require a physician referral. Some insurers require referrals or may have additional requirements for certain medical care. All appointments are prioritized on the basis of medical need.

The Department of Urology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona provides state-of-the-art comprehensive care in all areas of urology. Specialists in urology perform a wide range of complex, minimally invasive operations, including robotic prostatectomies.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 800-446-2279 (toll-free) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mountain Standard Time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

The Department of Urology at Mayo Clinic in Florida provides state-of-the-art comprehensive care in all areas of urology. Specialists in urology perform a wide range of complex, minimally invasive operations, including robotic prostatectomies.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 904-953-0853 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

The Department of Urology at Mayo Clinic in Minnesota provides state-of-the-art comprehensive care in all areas of urology. Specialists in urology perform a wide range of complex, minimally invasive operations, including robotic prostatectomies.

For appointments or more information, call the Central Appointment Office at 507-538-3270 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Central time, Monday through Friday or complete an online appointment request form.

See information on patient services at the three Mayo Clinic locations, including transportation options and lodging.

The Department of Urology at Mayo Clinic is engaged in continuous research to advance new treatment options for prostate cancer and other urologic conditions. Current studies include evaluating quality of life and operative outcomes after robotic prostatectomy. This type of research allows Mayo Clinic surgeons to provide the highest level of care for people who have this procedure. Additional research is being done on the biology of prostate cancer.

Publications

See a list of publications by Mayo Clinic doctors on robotic prostatectomy on PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine.

Aug. 15, 2011