Results

After you complete radiation therapy, your radiation oncologist will schedule follow-up visits to monitor your progress, look for late side effects and check for signs of recurrence. You'll need less frequent follow-up visits the longer you're cancer-free, but you're likely to see your medical oncologist for the rest of your life.

When your radiation therapy is completed, tell your doctor or nurse if you experience:

  • Persistent pain
  • New lumps, bruises, rashes, swelling or bleeding
  • Persistent digestive complaints such as appetite changes, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • A fever or cough that doesn't go away
  • Any other bothersome symptoms
Oct. 27, 2016
References
  1. Radiation therapy for breast cancer. American Cancer Society. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancer/detailedguide/breast-cancer-treating-radiation. Accessed Aug. 28, 2016.
  2. De Los Santos JF. Adjuvant radiation therapy for women with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic breast cancer. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  3. Pierce LJ. Radiation therapy techniques for newly diagnosed, non-metastatic breast cancer. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 16, 2016.
  4. Breast cancer. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed May 5, 2016.
  5. Understanding radiation therapy. American Society of Clinical Oncology. http://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/how-cancer-treated/radiation-therapy/understanding-radiation-therapy. Accessed Aug. 28, 2016.
  6. Radiation therapy and you: Support for people with cancer. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiation-therapy-and-you. Accessed Aug. 28, 2016.