Why it's done

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem, especially following prostate surgery and in older men. Oral medications prescribed to treat erectile dysfunction include sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra, Staxyn), tadalafil (Cialis, Adcirca) and avanafil (Stendra).

Other erectile dysfunction treatments include medications inserted through the tip of your penis into the tube inside that carries urine and semen (urethra), shots you inject into your penis (penile injections), and surgically placed penile implants.

A penis pump might be a good choice if these treatments cause side effects, don't work or aren't safe for you.

Penis pumps can be a good erectile dysfunction treatment for several reasons:

  • Penis pumps are effective. With practice and correct use, the majority of men can get an erection sufficient for sex.
  • Penis pumps pose less of a risk than do other treatments. The risk of side effects or complications is lower than it is with any other erectile dysfunction treatment.
  • The overall cost is lower. After the initial purchase, using a penis pump costs less than any other erectile dysfunction treatment.
  • Penis pumps are noninvasive. They don't require surgery, inserting medication into the tip of your penis or penile injections.
  • Penis pumps can be used with other treatments. A penis pump can be used along with medications or a penile implant. For some men, a combination of erectile dysfunction treatments works best.
  • Using a penis pump might help you regain erectile function after certain procedures. For example, using a penis pump might help restore your ability to get a natural erection after prostate surgery or radiation therapy for prostate cancer.
July 25, 2017
References
  1. Erectile dysfunction. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  2. Cunningham GR, et al. Treatment of male sexual dysfunction. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  3. Bratu O, et al. Erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy — A challenge for both patient and physician. Journal of Medicine and Life. 2017;10:13.
  4. Longo DL, et al., eds. Sexual dysfunction. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  5. AUA guideline on the management of erectile dysfunction: Diagnosis and treatment recommendation. Linthicum, Md.: American Urological Association. http://www.auanet.org/education/guidelines/erectile-dysfunction.cfm. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  6. Tintinalli JE, et al. Complications of urologic procedures and devices. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2016. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  7. Pfenninger JL, et al. Vacuum devices for erectile dysfunction. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2011. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 22, 2017.
  8. Nugteren HM, et al. Penile enlargement: From medication to surgery. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy. 2010;36:118.
  9. South-Paul JE, et al. Adult sexual dysfunction. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Family Medicine. 4th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed May 22, 2017.