How you prepare

If you're interested in prenatal cell-free DNA screening, talk to your health care provider about its availability. Also, consider checking to see if your health insurance covers the cost of prenatal cell-free DNA screening.

Before you undergo prenatal cell-free DNA screening, your health care provider or a genetic counselor will explain the possible results and what they might mean for you and your baby. Be sure to discuss any questions or concerns you have about the testing process.

Feb. 23, 2016
  1. AskMayoExpert. Prenatal cell-free DNA screening. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Committee Opinion No. 640: Cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;126:e31.
  3. Allyse M, et al. Non-invasive prenatal testing: A review of international implementation and challenges. International Journal of Women's Health. 2015;7:113.
  4. Prenatal cell-free DNA screening: Q&A for healthcare providers. National Society of Genetic Counselors. Accessed Jan. 6, 2016.
  5. Prenatal cell-free DNA screening. National Society of Genetic Counselors. Accessed Jan. 6, 2016.
  6. Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Publications Committee. #36: Prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015;212:711.

Prenatal cell-free DNA screening