Coping and support

It's normal to feel anxious or overwhelmed while waiting for a transplant or to have fears about rejection, returning to work or other issues after a transplant. Seeking the support of friends and family members can help you cope during this stressful time.

Your Mayo Clinic transplant team also can assist you with other useful resources and coping strategies throughout the transplant process, such as:

  • Joining a support group for transplant recipients. Talking with others who have shared your experience can ease fears and anxiety.
  • Getting additional treatment. If you're depressed, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend medications or refer you to a mental health professional.
  • Sharing your experiences on social media. Mayo Clinic has a Transplantation at Mayo Clinic Facebook page dedicated to helping transplant recipients and donors connect to each other online. Mayo Clinic also offers a Transplants group in Mayo Clinic Connect.
  • Finding rehabilitation services. If you're returning to work, your Mayo Clinic social worker may be able to connect you with rehabilitation services provided by your home state's vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Setting realistic goals and expectations. Recognize that life after a transplant may not be exactly the same as life before a transplant. Having realistic expectations about results and recovery time can help reduce stress.
  • Educating yourself. Read as much as you can about your procedure and ask questions about things you don't understand. Knowledge is empowering.
Oct. 13, 2016
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  8. Partnering with your transplant team: The patient's guide to transplantation. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Accessed May 11, 2016.
  9. Valapour M, et al. OPTN/SRTR annual data report 2014: Lung. American Journal of Transplantation. 2016;16:141.
  10. Bhorade S, et al. Induction immunosuppression following lung transplantation. Accessed May 10, 2016.
  11. Bhorade S, et al. Maintenance immunosuppression following lung transplantation. Accessed May 10, 2016.
  12. What every patient needs to know. United Network for Organ Sharing. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  13. Diet and exercise. United Network for Organ Sharing: Transplant living. Accessed May 13, 2016.
  14. Palmer SM, et al. Bacterial infections following lung transplantation. Accessed July 13, 2016.
  15. What is pulmonary rehabilitation? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Accessed July 13, 2016.
  16. Cypel M, et al. Lung transplantation: Procedure and postoperative management. Accessed May 10, 2016.
  17. What is bronchoscopy? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Accessed July 19, 2016.
  18. Erasmus DB (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Aug. 15, 2016.

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