Coping and support

It's normal to feel anxious or overwhelmed while waiting for a transplant or to have fears about rejection, returning to work or other issues after a transplant. Seeking the support of friends and family members can help you cope during this stressful time.

Your Mayo Clinic transplant team can also assist you with other useful resources and coping strategies throughout the transplant process, such as:

  • Joining a support group for transplant recipients. Talking with others who have shared your experience can ease fears and anxiety.
  • Sharing your experiences on social media. Mayo Clinic has a Transplantation at Mayo Clinic Facebook page dedicated to helping transplant recipients and donors connect to each other online.
  • Finding rehabilitation services. If you're returning to work, your Mayo Clinic social worker may be able to connect you with rehabilitation services provided by your home state's department of vocational rehabilitation.
  • Setting realistic goals and expectations. Recognize that life after transplant may not be exactly the same as life before transplant. Having realistic expectations about results and recovery time can help reduce stress.
  • Educating yourself. Learn as much as you can about your procedure and ask questions about things you don't understand. Knowledge is empowering.
Sept. 24, 2016
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Liver transplantation. In: Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  2. Liver transplant. American Liver Foundation. http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/transplant/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  3. What I need to know about liver transplantation. National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/livertransplant_ez/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  4. Questions & answers for transplant candidates about MELD and PELD. United Network for Organ Sharing. http://www.unos.org/docs/MELD_PELD. Accessed May 28, 2014.
  5. Liver Kaplan-Meier patient survival rates for transplants performed: 1997-2004. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/view-data-reports/national-data/#. Accessed May 28, 2016.
  6. Selecting a hospital. United Network for Organ Sharing http://www.transplantliving.org/before-the-transplant/getting-on-the-list/selecting-a-hospital/. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  7. Dove LM, et al. Liver transplantation in adults: Patient selection and pretransplantation evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  8. Bambha K, et al. Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  9. Cotler S. Living donor liver transplantation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 13, 2016.
  10. Partnering with your transplant team: The patient's guide to transplantation. United Network for Organ Sharing. https://www.unos.org/wp-content/uploads/unos/WEPNTK.pdf. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  11. Kim WR, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2014 annual data report: Liver. American Journal of Transplantation. 2016;16:11.
  12. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Liver transplant. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2013.
  13. Glorioso JM, et al. Pivotal preclinical trial of the spheroid reservoir bioartificial liver. Journal of Hepatology. 2015;63:388.
  14. Yu Y, et al. Cell therapies for liver diseases. Liver Transplantation. 2012;18:9.
  15. Taner T, et al. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney International. 2016;89:909.
  16. De Assuncao TM, et al. Development and characterization of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cholangiocytes. Laboratory Investigation. 2015;95:684.
  17. Croome KP, et al. The use of donation after cardiac death allografts does not increase recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. American Journal of Transplantation. 2015;15:2704.
  18. Tincani G, et al. Operative risks of domino liver transplantation for the familial amyloid polyneuropathy liver donor and recipient: A double analysis. American Journal of Transplantation. 2011;11:750.
  19. Kitchens WH. Domino liver transplantation: Indications, techniques, and outcomes. Transplantation Reviews. 2011;25:167.
  20. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. http://www.srtr.org/default.aspx. Accessed April 11, 2016.
  21. Heimbach JK (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 19, 2016.