How you prepare

No special preparations are necessary for HIV testing. You may need to call your doctor to schedule an appointment. Some public health clinics may allow you to simply walk in for HIV testing.

Jan. 21, 2017
References
  1. HIV test types. AIDS.gov. https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/prevention/hiv-testing/hiv-test-types/. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  2. Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of HIV infection: Updated recommendations. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/testing/laboratorytests.html. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, et al. Revised recommendations for HIV testing of adults, adolescents, and pregnant women in health-care settings. MMWR. 2006;55:1. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5514a1.htm. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  4. HIV overview. National Institutes of Health. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/education-materials/fact-sheets/19/45/hiv-aids--the-basics. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  5. Bartlett JG. Screening and diagnostic testing for HIV infection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  6. HIV infection and AIDS. American Association for Clinical Chemistry. https://labtestsonline.org/understanding/conditions/hiv/. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  7. HIV antibody and HIV antigen (p24). American Association for Clinical Chemistry. https://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/hiv-antibody/tab/test/. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.
  8. HIV/AIDS: Testing. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/testing.html. Accessed Jan. 2, 2017.