Results

Your body gradually and naturally absorbs the treated tissue over months and even years. This means that an ultrasound may show the fibroid still there. However, an MRI shows that the fibroid has been treated, and your symptoms reflect that improvement.

The majority of women experience significant improvement in the severity of their fibroid-related symptoms within the first few months after focused ultrasound surgery.

April 30, 2016
References
  1. Zupi E, et al. Nonsurgical alternatives for uterine fibroids. Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology. In press. Accessed March 20, 2016.
  2. Kong CY, et al. MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery for uterine fibroid treatment: A cost-effective analysis. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2014;203:361.
  3. Jacoby VL, et al. PROMISe trial: A pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound for uterine fibroids. Fertility and Sterility. 2016;105:773.
  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Body. RadiologyInfo.org. http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=bodymr. Accessed March 20, 2016.
  5. Kim HK, et al. Three cases of complications after high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment in unmarried women. Obstetrics and Gynecology Science. 2015;58:542.
  6. Mindjuk I, et al. MRI predictors of clinical success in MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments of uterine fibroids: Results from a single centre. European Radiology. 2015;25:1317.
  7. Stewart EA. Uterine fibroids. New England Journal of Medicine. 2015;372:1646.
  8. Coakley FV, et al. Pelvic applications of MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound. Abdominal Imaging. 2013;38:1120.
  9. Stewart EA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 1, 2016.