Results

At the end of your eye exam, you and your doctor will discuss the results of all testing, including an assessment of your vision, your risk of eye disease and preventive measures you can take to protect your eyesight.

Normal results from an eye exam include:

  • 20/20 vision
  • Good peripheral vision
  • Ability to distinguish various colors
  • Normal-appearing structures of the external eye
  • Absence of cataract, glaucoma or retinal disorders, such as macular degeneration

Your doctor may give you a prescription for corrective lenses. If your eye exam yields other abnormal results, your doctor will discuss with you next steps for further testing or for treating an underlying condition.

Feb. 26, 2016
References
  1. Pediatric eye and vision examination. American Optometric Association. https://www.aoa.org/documents/CPG-2.pdf. Accessed Dec. 18, 2015.
  2. Clinical practice guidelines: Comprehensive eye and vision examination. American Optometric Association. http://www.aoa.org/eye-exams.xml. Accessed Dec. 6, 2015.
  3. The difference between an ophthalmologist, optometrist and optician. American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. http://www.aapos.org/terms/conditions/132. Accessed Dec. 18, 2015.
  4. Recommended eye examination frequency for pediatric patients and adults. American Optometric Association. http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/comprehensive-eye-and-vision-examination/recommended-examination-frequency-for-pediatric-patients-and-adults?sso=y. Accessed Dec. 6, 2015.
  5. Jacobs DS. Open-angle glaucoma: Epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 18, 2015.
  6. Evaluation of the Ophthalmologic Patient. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/eye-disorders/approach-to-the-ophthalmologic-patient/evaluation-of-the-ophthalmologic-patient. Accessed Dec. 18, 2015.
  7. Knoop KJ. Slit-lamp examination. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  8. Elliott DB, et al. Evidence-based eye examinations. In: Clinical Procedures in Primary Eye Care. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  9. Elliott DB, et al. Assessment of visual function. In: Clinical Procedures in Primary Eye Care. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  10. Elliott DB, et al. Ocular health assessment. In: Clinical Procedures in Primary Eye Care. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  11. Policy statement: Vision screening for infants and children. American Academy of Ophthalmology. http://www.aao.org/clinical-statement/vision-screening-infants-children--2013. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  12. Policy statement: Frequency of ocular examinations. American Academy of Ophthalmology. http://www.aao.org/clinical-statement/frequency-of-ocular-examinations--november-2009. Accessed Jan. 5, 2016.
  13. Robertson DM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 5, 2016.