Results

You'll have a follow-up appointment with the gastroenterologist to discuss the outcome of your endoscopic mucosal resection and the results of any laboratory tests performed on tissue samples. Questions to ask your doctor include:

  • Were you able to remove all abnormal tissue?
  • What were the results of the laboratory tests? Do I have cancer?
  • Do I need to see a cancer specialist (oncologist)?
  • If I have cancer, will I need additional treatments?
  • How will you monitor my condition?

Typically, you will have another upper endoscopy or colonoscopy several months after your procedure to be sure the entire lesion is gone. During your first procedure, your doctor may mark the area of the removed lesion with ink (tattoo) so that the area can be easily checked during any future exams. The needs for additional appointments depend on the results of these findings.

Aug. 31, 2017
References
  1. Gunaratnam NT, et al. Overview of endoscopic resection of gastrointestinal tumors. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 17, 2017.
  2. Upper GI endoscopy. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/upperendoscopy/index.aspx. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  3. Preparing for your upper GI endoscopy. American Gastroenterological Association. http://www.gastro.org/attachments/6515/3_UpperGIEndoscopy_Prep_Design.pdf. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  4. Hwang JH, et al. Endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2015;82:215.
  5. Klein A, et al. How to perform high-quality endoscopic mucosal resection during colonoscopy. Gastroenterology. 2017;152:466.
  6. Odze RD, et al., eds. Gastrointestinal tract endoscopic and tissue processing techniques and normal histology. In: Odze and Goldblum Surgical Pathology of the GI Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract and Pancreas. Surgical Pathology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 26, 2017.