Why it's done

Egg freezing might be an option if you're not ready to become pregnant now but want to try to ensure your ability to get pregnant or have a biological child in the future.

Unlike with fertilized egg freezing (embryo cryopreservation), egg freezing doesn't require sperm because the eggs won't be fertilized before they're frozen. Just as with embryo freezing, however, you'll need to use fertility drugs to induce ovulation so that you'll produce multiple eggs for retrieval.

You might consider egg freezing if:

  • You're about to undergo treatment for cancer or another illness that may affect your future fertility potential. Certain medical treatments — such as radiation or chemotherapy — can harm your fertility. Egg freezing before treatment might allow you to have biological children at a later date.
  • You're undergoing in vitro fertilization. If your partner isn't able to produce sufficient sperm on the day you have your eggs retrieved, egg freezing might be needed. When undergoing in vitro fertilization, some people prefer egg freezing to embryo freezing for religious or ethical reasons.
  • You wish to preserve younger eggs now for future use. Freezing eggs at a younger age may help you preserve your ability to reproduce when the time is right in the future.

You can use your frozen eggs to try to conceive a biological child with sperm from a partner or a sperm donor. A donor can be known or anonymous. The embryo can also be implanted in the uterus of another person to carry the pregnancy (gestational carrier).

Jan. 07, 2016
References
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