Results

When you choose to use your frozen eggs, they'll be thawed, fertilized with sperm in a lab, and implanted in your or a gestational carrier's uterus.

Your health care team might recommend using a fertilization technique called intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In ICSI, a single healthy sperm is injected directly into each mature egg.

About 90 percent of eggs survive freezing and thawing, and about 75 percent will be successfully fertilized. The chances of becoming pregnant after implantation are roughly 30 to 60 percent, depending on your age at the time of egg freezing. The older you are at the time of egg freezing, the lower the likelihood that you'll have a live birth in the future.

Keep in mind that pregnancy rates might be lower when frozen eggs are used, compared with fresh or frozen embryos.

Jan. 07, 2016
References
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