Why it's done

Deep brain stimulation is an established treatment for movement disorders, such as essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and dystonia, and more recently, obsessive-compulsive disorder.

This treatment is reserved for people who aren't able to get control of their symptoms with medications.

Nov. 11, 2015
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