Risks

An estimated 12 out of 100 women who've never given birth will get pregnant during the first year of typical use of the contraceptive sponge. An estimated 24 out of 100 women who've given birth will get pregnant during the first year of typical use of the contraceptive sponge.

The contraceptive sponge doesn't protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The contraceptive sponge and the spermicide it releases may cause:

  • Vaginal irritation or dryness
  • Urinary tract or vaginal infection
  • An increased risk of contracting STIs
  • Toxic shock syndrome
Dec. 18, 2015
References
  1. Birth control methods fact sheet. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/birth-control-methods.html. Accessed Oct. 9, 2015.
  2. Choosing a birth control method. Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. https://www.arhp.org/Publications-and-Resources/Patient-Resources/Interactive-Tools/Choosing-a-Birth-Control-Method. Accessed Oct. 11, 2015.
  3. Barrier methods of contraception. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq022.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20121114T1235173378. Accessed Oct. 9, 2015.
  4. Zieman M. Overview of contraception. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 9, 2015.
  5. Today Sponge information leaflet. Mayer Laboratories Inc. http://www.todaysponge.com. Accessed Oct. 11, 2015.
  6. Hatcher RA, et al. Vaginal barriers and spermicides. In: Contraceptive Technology. 20th ed. New York, N.Y.: Ardent Media; 2011.
  7. Pruthi SM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 19, 2015.