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Male condoms are an effective form of birth control. However, about 1 out of 50 couples who use condoms correctly will get pregnant in a year. Chances of pregnancy increase if you don't always wear a condom during intercourse, or you use condoms incorrectly.

Condoms are effective at preventing the transmission of most STIs, although there's still some risk. When used correctly, a condom creates a barrier that limits your exposure — and your partner's exposure — to semen or other body fluids that can carry STIs.

March 11, 2017
References
  1. Choosing a birth control method: Male condom. Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. http://www.arhp.org/Publications-and-Resources/Quick-Reference-Guide-for-Clinicians/choosing/Male-condom. Accessed Dec. 5, 2016.
  2. Male condom. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.hhs.gov/opa/pregnancy-prevention/non-hormonal-methods/male-condom/index.html. Accessed Dec. 5, 2016.
  3. Stone KM, et al. Male condoms. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 5, 2016.
  4. Condoms. National Health Service. http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception-guide/pages/male-condoms.aspx. Accessed Dec. 5, 2016.
  5. Latex allergy. American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. http://acaai.org/allergies/types/skin-allergies/latex-allergy. Accessed Dec. 6, 2016.