Risks

Complications after cataract surgery are uncommon, and most can be treated successfully.

Cataract surgery risks include:

  • Inflammation
  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Swelling
  • Drooping eyelid
  • Dislocation of artificial lens
  • Retinal detachment
  • Glaucoma
  • Secondary cataract
  • Loss of vision

Your risk of complications is greater if you have another eye disease or a serious medical condition. Occasionally, cataract surgery fails to improve vision because of underlying eye damage from other conditions, such as glaucoma or macular degeneration. If possible, it may be beneficial to evaluate and treat other eye problems before making the decision to have cataract surgery.

Sept. 28, 2016
References
  1. Cataract surgery. American Optometric Association. http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/eye-and-vision-problems/glossary-of-eye-and-vision-conditions/cataract/cataract-surgery?sso=y. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  2. Jacobs DS. Cataract in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 19, 2016.
  3. Facts about cataract. National Eye Institute. http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/cataract/cataract_facts.asp. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  4. Cataract surgery. American Academy of Ophthalmology. http://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-cataract-surgery. Accessed May 22, 2016.
  5. Cataract in the adult eye PPP. American Academy of Ophthalmology. http://www.aao.org/preferred-practice-pattern/cataract-in-adult-eye-ppp--october-2011. Accessed May 23, 2016.
  6. Shorstein NH, et al. Comparative effectiveness of three prophylactic strategies to prevent clinical macular edema after phacoemulsification surgery. Ophthalmology. 2015;122:2450.