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Sept. 01, 2016
References
  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer risk and genetic testing. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  2. Peshkin BN, et al. Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  4. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and genetic testing for BRCA-related cancer in women: Recommendation statement. American Family Physician. 2015;91:118A.
  5. Peshkin BN, et al. BRCA1 and BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  6. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Genetic factors: Hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes. In: Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  7. Raby BA, et al. Genetic counseling and testing. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  8. Isaacs C, et al. Management of patients at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  9. Stan DL, et al. Challenging and complex decisions in the management of the BRCA mutation carrier. Journal of Women's Health. 2013;22:825.
  10. Pruthi S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 20, 2016.
  11. Brendish KH (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. July 20, 2016.
  12. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: Breast and ovarian. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed July 20, 2016.