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Sept. 01, 2016
  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer risk and genetic testing. National Cancer Institute. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  2. Peshkin BN, et al. Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  4. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and genetic testing for BRCA-related cancer in women: Recommendation statement. American Family Physician. 2015;91:118A.
  5. Peshkin BN, et al. BRCA1 and BRCA2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  6. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Genetic factors: Hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes. In: Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  7. Raby BA, et al. Genetic counseling and testing. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  8. Isaacs C, et al. Management of patients at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Accessed June 3, 2016.
  9. Stan DL, et al. Challenging and complex decisions in the management of the BRCA mutation carrier. Journal of Women's Health. 2013;22:825.
  10. Pruthi S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 20, 2016.
  11. Brendish KH (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. July 20, 2016.
  12. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: Breast and ovarian. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Accessed July 20, 2016.

BRCA gene test for breast and ovarian cancer risk