Cancer patient stories

  1. Alfred “Bart” Howe

    Three Strikes … But Not Out

    Personal Background My name is Alfred “Bart” Howe and I am a very lucky guy. I was born 1938 in a small oilfield town in Oklahoma. Mary and I married in 1965 and have two married sons, a grandson and a granddaughter. Mary and I raised our family in Boulder, Colorado and have lived here [...]

  2. Make Good Things Come From Bad

    During a hospitalization for pneumonia more than 20 years ago in her hometown of Barrington, IL, Ilse Hein received very frightening news: she had multiple myeloma. Initially she understood that she had a skin cancer (a melanoma), though she soon learned that multiple myeloma was actually very different: a complex cancer of the bone marrow. [...]

  3. One Mayo – Running for a Cure

    For the past four years, I’ve heard the buzz about the 26.2 with Donna: The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer. While I always felt it was a wonderful cause — with proceeds benefiting Mayo Clinic for breast cancer research — it wasn’t until I recently participated in the event that I came to realize [...]

  4. Ginette Weiner

    Ginette's Top Tips for Breast Cancer Patients and Those Who Love Them

    Ginette Weiner began her fight against breast cancer in 2008, and underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. She is a patient at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and under the ongoing care of Donald Northfelt, M.D. She brings a fresh, honest and engaging perspective to patients and their loved ones with the following advice for breast cancer patients and their families. Advice for Loved Ones 1.  Do not tell [...]

  5. Anna's Story: A Personal Approach to Cancer

    At age 30, Anna Webster was a busy single mom juggling work and caring for her 11-year-old daughter. She didn’t have time to be sick. But after passing out one evening in the spring of 2009, she spent three days in a Jacksonville, Fla., emergency room while doctors tried to figure out what was wrong. [...]

  6. Adventures of a 31-year-old Pancreatic Cancer Survivor

    Dorylee Baez lives fearlessly. Whether flying down a zip line or organizing a pancreatic cancer patient group in Puerto Rico, she plunges into life with zest. The 31-year-old academic advisor at Universidad del Este in Carolina, Puerto Rico, is known as someone who is tenacious, overcoming whatever obstacles get in her way to achieve and [...]

  7. An upbeat attitude and a brisk tempo keep this musician playing

    Wain McFarlane knows how to work a problem. When hypertension caused Wain's kidneys to fail in 2006, he built dialysis into his busy schedule. And when, just months after receiving a kidney from his 26-year-old niece, Wain was diagnosed with liver cancer, he knew he and his Mayo Clinic team would deal with it, quickly. [...]

  8. Monica Hansen

    Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer offers renewed hope

    When Monica Hansen of Minneapolis came to Mayo Clinic in March 2008, she needed answers, and she needed them quickly. A 30-year-old first-time parent, Monica gave birth to a son in September 2007. As many women do, Monica suffered from hemorrhoids throughout her pregnancy. Except in Monica's situation, they didn't go away once her son [...]

  9. Richard Rubenstein: Overcoming Rectal Cancer

    A routine colonoscopy in 2007 saved Richard Rubenstein’s life. Richard, a retired executive from Scottsdale, Ariz., had expected to receive a clean bill of health, especially since he had no alarming symptoms or any family history of colorectal malignancies. Instead he received shocking news – he had stage 3 rectal cancer. Richard decided to pursue his [...]

  10. James Donnelly

    Cancer & Coordinated Approach to Care

    Professor  had a feeling in his throat area for months, but was told not to worry about it. After two to three years it hadn't gotten better. Though he had no pain, his speech was beginning to slur, and he was referred to another doctor. The second doctor diagnosed the cancer and described the surgery [...]

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