Engineering

The Mayo Clinic Division of Engineering is a comprehensive engineering organization that routinely develops unique medical devices and systems to enhance patient care and support medical education and research. The division has been an integral part of Mayo Clinic since 1948, playing a critical role in the advancement of health care.

The division is staffed by biomedical, chemical, electrical, mechanical and software engineers; electronic technicians; machinists; mechanical designers; and a scientific glassblower with a broad background in industry and academia. Our current staff has a combined 1,000 years of experience providing engineering solutions.

Working hand in hand with physicians, scientists and other Mayo Clinic staff, the division develops unique medical devices and systems, sometimes designed to meet the needs of individual patients.

Example: Bio-artificial liver

Bio-Artificial Liver developed by the Mayo Clinic Division of Engineering Bio-Artificial Liver

The Mayo Clinic Division of Engineering works with physicians, scientists and other Mayo Clinic staff to develop unique medical devices and systems, sometimes designed to meet the needs of individual patients. One system recently developed is a Bio-Artificial Liver designed to treat patients with acute liver failure.

Working with physicians and researchers, the division developed a cell-based liver support system — the Spheroid Reservoir Bio-Artificial Liver, or SRBAL — to treat patients with acute liver failure either as a bridge to liver transplantation or until spontaneous recovery of the patient's liver.

The system processes body fluids outside the body and includes software, firmware, device packaging and the spheroid reservoir bioreactor.

The spheroid reservoir bioreactor is a subsystem of the SRBAL that contains normal living liver cells in suspension culture. The liver cells are cultured as anchorage-independent spherical aggregates called spheroids. The liver spheroids are first formed by a novel patented rocker technique and then transferred to the spheroid reservoir bioreactor, where they are maintained in high-density suspension culture by a rotational propeller action.

The SRBAL also incorporates a dialysis system of pumps and sensors to manage extracorporeal body fluid levels, as acute liver failure is often associated with kidney dysfunction.

Contact

For information about engineering careers, contact:

  1. Jennifer A. Eble
    1. Human Resources
      Mayo Clinic
      200 First St. SW
      Rochester, MN 55905
    2. Phone: 800-562-7984