Heart Disease Risk Calculator

Calculating Results

Use the heart disease risk calculator to find out your risk of cardiovascular disease.

years
ft. in.
cm.
lbs.
Switch to Metric Units

This heart disease risk assessment is most accurate for people between ages 20 and 74. For people younger than 20 or older than 74, the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors suggests a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. If you're in that category, you should seek additional evaluation and treatment advice from your doctor.

Total cholesterol level
HDL ("good") cholesterol level
Systolic (top number)
Diastolic (bottom number)

If you don't know your blood pressure measurements, it's still possible to estimate your cardiovascular disease risk. However, the estimate will be more accurate if you supply your actual blood pressure measurements.

Note: Vigorous physical activity is any activity that makes you breathe much harder than usual, such as aerobic exercise or fast bicycling. Moderately intense physical activity makes you breathe somewhat harder than usual, such as bicycling at a regular pace or doubles tennis.

Base your answers on your eating habits last month. Note: One serving is about the size of a small apple or small potato.

Serving sizes of common foods with saturated fat: Hamburger, steak, bacon, ham, sausage (3 ounces or the size of a deck of cards); butter (1 teaspoon); whole milk (1 cup); ice cream (1/2 cup); cheese (1 prepackaged slice, about 1 ounce).

Since you have a history of cardiovascular disease, work with your doctor to determine your risk.

Your risk of cardiovascular diseaseheart attack or stroke

Your risk represents the chance that you'll have cardiovascular diseasea heart attack or stroke at any point in the next s.

Take action to reduce your risk

If you were to control your risk factors for cardiovascular diseaseheart attack or stroke to acceptable levels, then your risk would be:

Your risk of cardiovascular disease is at or near the acceptable level. Keep up the good work!

Before increasing your physical activity level, check with your doctor to make sure it's safe for you to proceed.

  • Gradually increase your physical activity toward a goal of at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, or an equal combination of moderate and vigorous activity a week. Perform at least 10 minutes of aerobic exercise at one time, and spread aerobic exercise throughout your week. Include strength training exercises at least two days a week.
  • Gradually increase your physical activity toward a goal of at least 150 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity, 300 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, or an equal combination of moderate and vigorous activity a week. Perform at least 10 minutes of aerobic exercise at one time, and spread aerobic exercise throughout your week. Include strength training exercises at least two days a week.
  • If you're currently doing no physical activity, you may want to consider starting with 15 minutes of physical activity two or three days a week, and work your way up gradually to the goals listed above.
  • Eat a healthy diet.
  • Eat a healthy diet that emphasizes:
    • Fruits, vegetables and whole grains
    • Low-fat dairy products and low-fat proteins, such as poultry, fish and legumes
    • Moderate amounts of healthy fats, such as unsalted nuts, and vegetable and olive oils
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don't smoke cigarettes or use tobacco.
  • Reduce the number of calories in your daily diet.
  • Ask your doctor if he or she suggests that you have screening tests and treatments regarding your cardiovascular disease risk.
  • Limit the amount of salt in your diet.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink.
  • If you're overweight or obese, lose weight.
  • Take blood pressure medications if your doctor recommends them.
  • Check your blood pressure and check with your doctor if your measurements are too high.
  • Try the DASH diet, an approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure.
  • If you're overweight or obese, lose weight.
  • Take diabetes medications as recommended by your doctor.
  • Check your blood sugar and keep it under control as recommended by your doctor.
  • Seek counseling or medication therapy to help you quit smoking or using tobacco. For more information about how to quit smoking, talk to your doctor.
  • Go to the doctor and get your blood pressure checked.

You have a personal history of heart disease. To help keep your heart as healthy as possible:

  • Gradually increase your physical activity toward a goal of at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity, 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity, or an equal combination of moderate and vigorous activity a week. Perform at least 10 minutes of aerobic exercise at one time, and spread aerobic exercise throughout your week. Include strength training exercises at least two days a week.
  • Eat a healthy diet that emphasizes:
    • Fruits, vegetables and whole grains
    • Low-fat dairy products and low-fat proteins, such as poultry, fish and legumes
    • Moderate amounts of healthy fats, such as unsalted nuts, and vegetable and olive oils
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Don't smoke cigarettes or use tobacco.
  • Take medications your doctor has prescribed for your heart condition and other conditions, such as aspirin, statin medications or blood pressure medications.
  • Make sure you have follow-up appointments with your doctor on a regular basis.

Additional factors that may influence your risk include:

Additional risk factors:

  • None
  • Family history
  • Physical inactivity
  • Low number of fruits and vegetables in your diet
  • High amount of saturated fat

Protective risk factors:

  • None
  • High amount of physical activity
  • High number of fruits and vegetables in your diet
  • Low amount of saturated fat
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About this tool

This interactive tool estimates your risk compared with others in your age group based on factors such as your weight, activity level and smoking history. The tool uses the following formulas:

  • If you know your lipids information and you are younger than age 60, the Framingham Heart Study General Cardiovascular Disease 30-Year Lipid-Based Risk Score Calculator is used.
  • If you don't know your lipids information and you are younger than age 60, the Framingham Heart Study General Cardiovascular Disease 30-Year BMI-Based Risk Score Calculator is used.
  • If you know your lipids information and you are age 60 or older, the ACC/AHA Pooled Cohort Equations CV Risk Calculator is used.
  • If you don't know your lipids information and you are age 60 or older, the Framingham Heart Study Cardiovascular Disease 10-Year BMI-Based Risk Score Calculator is used.

This information is provided as a guide. Be sure to discuss any health concerns with your doctor.

References

  1. Coronary artery disease – coronary heart disease. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Coronary-Artery-Disease---Coronary-Heart-Disease_UCM_436416_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 21, 2013.
  2. Understand your risk of heart attack. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartAttack/UnderstandYourRiskofHeartAttack/Understand-Your-Risk-of-Heart-Attack_UCM_002040_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  3. How cardiovascular and stroke risks relate. American Stroke Association. http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/LifeAfterStroke/HealthyLivingAfterStroke/UnderstandingRiskyConditions/How-Cardiovascular-Stroke-Risks-Relate_UCM_310369_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  4. What is peripheral arterial disease? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/pad/. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  5. Dekkers JC, et al. Accuracy of self-reported body weight, height and waist circumference in a Dutch overweight working population. BMC Medical Research Methodology. 2008;8:69.
  6. Pencina MJ, et al. Predicting the 30-year risk of cardiovascular disease: The Framingham Heart Study. Circulation. 2009;119:3078.
  7. D'Agostino RB, et al. General cardiovascular risk profile for use in primary care: The Framingham Heart Study. Circulation. 2008;117:743.
  8. High blood pressure and women. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/UnderstandYourRiskforHighBloodPressure/High-Blood-Pressure-and-Women_UCM_301867_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  9. Fraser A, et al. Associations of pregnancy complications with calculated cardiovascular disease risk and cardiovascular risk factors in middle age: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Circulation. 2012;125:1367.
  10. Goff DC, et al. 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the assessment of cardiovascular risk. Circulation. In press. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  11. Kidney disease and diabetes. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Diabetes/WhyDiabetesMatters/Kidney-Disease-Diabetes_UCM_313867_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  12. Menopause and heart disease. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/MyHeartandStrokeNews/Menopause-and-Heart-Disease_UCM_448432_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  13. Lower heart disease risk: What are the risk factors for heart disease? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/educational/hearttruth/lower-risk/risk-factors.htm. Accessed Nov. 21, 2013.
  14. Your guide to physical activity and your heart. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/yg_phyac.htm. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  15. American Heart Association recommendations for physical activity in adults. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/StartWalking/American-Heart-Association-Recommendations-for-Physical-Activity-in-Adults_UCM_307976_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  16. 5 goals to healthy eating. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/WeightManagement/LosingWeight/5-Goals-to-Healthy-Eating_UCM_307257_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  17. Eckel RH, et al. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. In press. Accessed Nov. 22, 2013.
  18. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.health.gov/PAGUIDELINES/guidelines/default.aspx. Accessed Nov. 20, 2013.
  19. How is coronary artery disease treated? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cad/treatment.html. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  20. Living with coronary heart disease. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/cad/livingwith.html. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  21. Jensen MD, et al. 2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. In press. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  22. Home blood pressure monitoring. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/SymptomsDiagnosisMonitoringofHighBloodPressure/Home-Blood-Pressure-Monitoring_UCM_301874_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  23. Prevention and treatment of high blood pressure. American Heart Association. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/PreventionTreatmentofHighBloodPressure/Prevention-Treatment-of-High-Blood-Pressure_UCM_002054_Article.jsp. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  24. Prevent diabetes problems: Keep your heart and blood vessels healthy. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/complications_heart/index.aspx. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.
  25. Assessing your weight and health risk. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/risk.htm. Accessed Nov. 26, 2013.
  26. Thomas RJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Dec. 4, 2013.
  27. Aortic aneurysms. The Merck Manuals: The Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/cardiovascular_disorders/diseases_of_the_aorta_and_its_branches/aortic_aneurysms.html?qt=aortic%20aneurysm&alt=sh. Accessed Dec. 4, 2013.
  28. Batsis JA, et al. Metabolic syndrome: From global epidemiology to individualized medicine. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2007;82:509.
  29. Giovino GA, et al. Tobacco use in 3 billion individuals from 16 countries: An analysis of nationally representative cross-sectional household surveys. Lancet. 2012;380:668.
  30. 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_2012.html. Accessed Dec. 9, 2013.
  31. Cappuccio FP, et al. Estimation of fruit and vegetable intake using a 2-item dietary questionnaire: A potential tool for primary health care workers. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. 2003;13:12.
  32. Lopez-Jimenez F (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Dec. 9, 2013.
  33. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs2010-PolicyDocument.htm. Accessed Dec. 9, 2013.
About this tool Print Results

The results from this assessment are estimates and should be interpreted as one factor in determining your risk of heart disease. These results may occasionally be inaccurate and may overestimate risk in some populations.

Created by Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research using content from Framingham Heart Study Cardiovascular Disease 10-Year BMI-Based Risk Score Calculator, Framingham Heart Study General Cardiovascular Disease 30-Year Lipid-Based and BMI-Based Calculators, and ACC/AHA Pooled Cohort Equations CV Risk Calculator.