Boiling down the dietary guidelines

The dietary guidelines call for more veggies and less salt, fat and sugar. Here's what that means for you.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

In an environment that promotes high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods with a more sedentary lifestyle, too many Americans are regularly eating too many calories. Hence, the obesity epidemic and related health problems such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

The good news is that a large body of evidence shows that healthy-eating patterns and regular physical activity can help people achieve and maintain good health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases.

The recommendations

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans provide five overarching recommendations:

  • Follow a healthy-eating pattern. A healthy-eating pattern and an appropriate calorie level will help you get the nutrition you need, achieve and maintain a healthy weight, and reduce your risk of chronic diseases.
  • Focus on variety, nutrient density and amount. To meet your nutrient needs and stay within your calorie limit, choose a variety of nutrient-dense foods across all food groups. Nutrient-dense foods include vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products.
  • Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats, and cut back on sodium. Follow an eating pattern that is low in added sugars, saturated fats and sodium.
  • Shift to healthier food and beverage choices. Choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages across all food groups in place of less healthy choices.
  • Support healthy-eating patterns for all. Everyone has a responsibility for supporting healthy-eating in all settings, such as at home, work or school, or wherever food is available.

What is a healthy-eating pattern?

A healthy-eating pattern is one that includes:

  • A variety of vegetables — dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy and other
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grains
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt and cheese, and fortified soy beverages
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds and soy products
  • Oils, including those from plants, and those that occur naturally in nuts, seeds, seafood, olives and avocados

The Healthy U.S.-Style, Healthy Mediterranean-Style and the Healthy Vegetarian Eating patterns are examples of dietary patterns designed to consider the types and proportions of foods Americans typically eat, but in nutrient-dense forms and appropriate amounts.

Recommended servings for US-style, Mediterranean-style and vegetarian eating patterns for 2,000 calories a day
Food group U.S. Mediterranean Vegetarian
Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2015
Vegetables 2 1/2 cups a day 2 1/2 cups a day 2 1/2 cups a day
Dark green 1 1/2 cups a week 1 1/2 cups a week 1 1/2 cups a week
Red and orange 5 1/2 cups a week 5 1/2 cups a week 5 1/2 cups a week
Legumes (beans and peas) 1 1/2 cups a week 1 1/2 cups a week 3 cups a week
Starchy 5 cups a week 5 cups a week 5 cups a week
Other 4 cups a week 4 cups a week 4 cups a week
Fruits 2 cups a day 2 1/2 cups a day 2 cups a day
Grains 6 ounces a day 6 ounces a day 6 1/2 ounces a day
Whole grains ≥ 3 ounces a day ≥ 3 ounces a day ≥ 3 1/2 ounces a day
Refined grains ≤ 3 ounces a day ≤ 3 ounces a day ≤ 3 ounces a day
Dairy 3 cups a day 2 cups a day 3 cups a day
Protein foods 5 1/2 ounces a day 6 1/2 ounces a day 3 1/2 ounces a day
Seafood 8 ounces a week 15 ounces a week  
Meats, poultry, eggs 26 ounces a week 26 ounces a week 3 ounces a week (eggs)
Nuts, seeds, soy products 4 ounces a week 5 ounces a week 14 ounces a week
Oils 27 grams a day 27 grams a day 27 grams a day
Limit on calories from added sugars, solid fats, added refined starches 270 calories a day (14% of total calories) 260 calories a day (13% of total calories) 290 calories a day (15% of total calories)
Jan. 14, 2016 See more In-depth