Round-the-clock newborn care can turn your life upside down. Use these practical strategies to handle the new stress in your life. By Mayo Clinic Staff

A newborn can bring a whirlwind of activity and excitement to your life — and plenty of stress and fatigue. Whether you're a first-time parent or a seasoned veteran, consider 10 practical tips to keep stress under control.

Resist the urge to count caffeine as a major food group or a substitute for sleep.

Instead, eat a healthy diet, drink plenty of water and get some fresh air. Sleep when the baby sleeps — and work out a nighttime schedule with your partner that allows both of you to rest and care for the baby. Do something you enjoy every day, either with the baby or on your own.

Good habits will help you maintain the energy you need to care for your newborn.

Friends and loved ones might come out of the woodwork to admire your newborn. Let them know which days work best and how much time you have for a visit.

Insist that visitors wash their hands before holding the baby, and ask anyone who's ill to stay home.

Don't be afraid to set aside your social graces, either. Let trusted visitors care for the baby while you get some much needed rest.

Allow plenty of time each day for nursing sessions, naps and crying spells. Keep scheduled activities to a minimum. When you need to head out, give yourself extra time to pack your supplies and change the inevitable out-the-door dirty diaper.

You might go from adoring your baby and marveling at tiny fingers and toes to grieving your loss of independence and worrying about your ability to care for a newborn, all in the space of a single diaper change.

Chances are, you and your partner are both tired and anxious as well.

To help you stay connected, talk about what's bothering you — such as a strained budget or difficulty soothing the baby. A shared laugh might help lighten the mood.

Hide the broom and leave dust bunnies where they lie. Store clean clothes in the laundry basket — or in stacks on the floor — until you need them. Clean the bathroom with a fresh diaper wipe. Serve cold cereal and peanut butter toast for dinner when you're too tired to prepare a more traditional meal.

If you're going stir-crazy with a fussy newborn, take the baby out for a walk. If you can, let someone you trust take over for a while.

When friends and loved ones offer to help, take them up on it. Suggest holding the baby, folding the laundry or running a few errands — whatever would help you the most.

Your newborn needs your love and attention, but you won't let your baby down by spending time with others.

If you have other children, set aside one-on-one time with each of them. Schedule dates with your partner. Meet a friend for lunch or a movie.

The newborn days won't last long. Step back and appreciate the moment, even amid the chaos.

Parenting is a challenge, even on a good day. If you're depressed or you're having trouble adjusting to life with a newborn, consult your health care provider or a mental health provider.

Learning to handle the new stress in your life can help you enjoy the riches parenting has to offer.

Oct. 17, 2012