Descripción general

Perspectiva general

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus that can infect almost anyone. Once infected, your body retains the virus for life. Most people don't know they have CMV because it rarely causes problems in healthy people.

But if you're pregnant or have a weakened immune system, CMV is cause for concern. A woman who develops an active CMV infection during pregnancy can pass the virus to her baby, who might then experience signs and symptoms. For people with compromised immunity, especially due to organ transplantation, CMV infection can be fatal.

CMV spreads from person to person through body fluids, such as blood, saliva, urine, semen and breast milk. There's no cure for the virus. However, medications can help treat newborns and people with weak immune systems.

April 12, 2017
References
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