Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (18 years and older)

Note: Avoid use of intranasal Zicam®. Numerous reports exist of loss of smell associated with zinc-containing Zicam® products. These zinc-containing formulas have since been withdrawn from the U.S. market.

The current recommended dietary allowance for zinc taken by mouth is: 11 milligrams for males 19 years old and older; 8 milligrams for females 19 years and older; 11 milligrams for pregnant females 19 years old and older; and 12 milligrams for lactating females 19 years and older.

For acne, doses of 40-300 milligrams of zinc sulfate two or three times daily with or without food have been taken by mouth for 4-12 weeks. 30-200 milligrams of zinc gluconate prior to a meal daily for 2-3 months has also been studied. The following preparations have been used on the skin: zinc (1.2-1.3%) combined with 4% erythromycin two times daily for up to one year; Nel's cream (containing chloroxylenol and zinc oxide and 5% benzoyl peroxide) two times daily for eight weeks; and 2% zinc sulfate in propylene glycol and ethanol applied three times daily for 12 weeks.

For acrodermatitis enteropathica (a rare inherited form of zinc deficiency), experts recommend 1-3 milligrams of zinc sulfate or gluconate salts per kilogram, taken by mouth daily. 45-220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily.

For age-related macular degeneration, 80-200 milligrams has been used with food once daily or in two divided doses for 2-7 years.

For hair loss, Zincomed, containing 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate, has been taken by mouth twice daily for three months.

For canker sores, 220-660 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken daily by mouth.

For burns, 660 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken daily by mouth.

For cancer, 90 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth daily for five days, with a maintenance dose of 180 milligrams daily. Zinc gluconate (two tablets, each containing 10 milligrams of zinc) has also been used daily for 10 days.

For chemotherapy side effects, 45 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily on the first day of radiation therapy, and one month after finishing treatment. Zinc gluconate has also been taken by mouth.

For rheumatic disease, 45 milligrams of zinc by mouth daily for two months was not associated with beneficial effects on clinical outcomes or inflammatory indexes.

For cognitive function, 15-30 milligrams of zinc by mouth daily for six months improved spatial working memory. However, unfavorable effects were observed on attention with the 15 milligram daily dose.

For the common cold, doses have ranged from 4.5-24 milligrams of zinc (gluconate or acetate) in the form of lozenges taken by mouth every 1-3 hours for 3-14 days or until symptoms resolved. Ten millimoles of zinc gluconate nasal spray has been used in the nose every 15-30 minutes. A loading dose of 46 milligrams of zinc gluconate has been used.

For people on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 100 milligrams of elemental zinc by mouth daily for three months did not improve nutritional status.

For skin disorders (leishamaniasis), 2.5-10 milligrams of zinc sulfate per kilogram by mouth for 45 days has shown beneficial effects. Cure rates were dose dependent. Intralesional injections of 2% zinc sulfate have also been studied.

For cystic fibrosis, 30 milligrams of zinc gluconate has been taken by mouth daily for 12 months.

For dandruff, shampoo containing 1 percent zinc pythione (ZPT) has been used.

For dementia, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate (containing 50 milligrams of elemental zinc) has been used by mouth three times daily for 24 weeks.

For diabetes and diabetic nerve pain, 660 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth for six weeks.

For people on dialysis, 50 milligrams of zinc by mouth has been used daily for blood cell effects.

For Down's syndrome, 135 milligrams of zinc sulfate taken by mouth daily for two months improved immune function.

For people receiving dialysis, 50 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily.

For eating disorders, 45-100 milligrams of zinc (zinc sulfate, zinc gluconate, or zinc acetate) has been taken daily by mouth. Twenty-five milligrams of zinc as zinc acetate in a solution taken daily by mouth 30 minutes before each of three meals, for three weeks in people with bulimia nervosa and for four weeks in people with anorexia nervosa, has been studied. A dose of 40 micromoles of zinc has been injected into the vein daily for seven days, followed by 15 milligrams by mouth daily for 60 days.

For eczema, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken daily by mouth (duration not specified).

For exercise performance, 20 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for seven days.

For boils, 45 milligrams of zinc (Solvezink®, Tika) has been used by mouth three times daily for four weeks.

For stomach ulcers, 300 milligrams of A-84 (e-acetamide zinc caproate) has been taken with meals three times daily for three weeks, and 300-900 milligrams of zinc acexamate has been taken with or without food 1-3 times daily for up to 90 days, sometimes followed by 600 milligrams of zinc acexamate once daily before bed for another three months. A single dose of 600 milligrams of zinc acexamate has been taken by mouth. Doses of 900-1,800 milligrams have been taken by mouth in steadily increasing doses daily for four weeks.

For Gilbert's syndrome, 40 milligrams of zinc sulfate in a single dose by mouth has been used for acute conditions. For chronic conditions, 100 milligrams of zinc sulfate in a single dose has been used by mouth for seven days.

For bad breath, one or two pieces of a zinc chewing gum has been chewed for at least 10 minutes, three times daily for one week.

For hepatic encephalopathy, 600 milligrams of zinc sulfate or zinc acetate has been taken by mouth daily for 7-10 days.

For herpes simplex virus, the following has been applied to the skin: 0.3% zinc oxide/glycine cream applied every two hours until the sore resolves or for 21 days; Virunderim Gel®, containing 10 milligrams of zinc sulfate, for up to 12 days; 0.01-0.05% zinc sulfate solution applied often during a breakout and once per week during remission; and 4% zinc sulfate solution in water.

For high cholesterol, 7.7 micromoles of zinc sulfate (50 milligrams of elemental zinc) has been taken by mouth daily for 90 days, and 150 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for 12 weeks. Doses of 15-160 milligrams have been taken daily for 4-52 weeks.

For high prolactin levels, acute administration of 37.5 milligrams of zinc sulfate (as zinc sulfate diluted in 20 milliliters of deionized water) every 30 minutes for 240 minutes was not shown to have an effect on prolactin levels. Chronic administration of 47.7 milligrams of zinc three times daily for 60 days was also not shown to have an effect on prolactin levels.

For HIV/AIDS, 10-200 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth daily for 14 days to 18 months as an aid to immune response, and 125 milligrams of zinc gluconate taken by mouth twice daily for three weeks increased the levels of immune cells.

For immune function, the following doses have been taken by mouth in various people: in the elderly, 12-150 milligrams of elemental zinc daily for up to one month, or 440 milligrams of zinc sulfate in two divided doses daily for one month, or 100 milligrams of zinc daily for three months; in people with alcoholic cirrhosis, 200 milligrams of zinc sulfate for two months; in people with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 0.02 milligrams of zinc per kilogram of body weight (duration unspecified); in healthy men, 30 milligrams of zinc daily for 14 weeks; in people with cancer, two tablets of zinc gluconate (each containing 10 milligrams of zinc) daily for 10 days; and 120 milligrams of zinc sulfate after dialysis sessions. A 10% zinc sulfate in Aquaphor® ointment has also been applied to the skin as a one-time dose. Intravenous zinc (dose unavailable) for eight weeks has been used. 30 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been used for the first three days of total parenteral nutrition. A dose of 17.3 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been administered intravenously in saline daily for 28 days. A dose of 30 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth daily during the first three days of nutrition injected into the vein. Doses of 10-20 milligrams of zinc gluconate have been taken by mouth daily for 120 days.

For impaired glucose tolerance, 200 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth three times daily for 60 days.

For incision wounds, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily following surgery to promote wound healing.

For infertility, the following doses have been taken by mouth: 50 milligrams of zinc daily in people undergoing hemodialysis; 66 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily for 26 weeks in fertile and subfertile males to increase sperm count; 250 milligrams of zinc sulfate twice daily for three months; 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate (Zincolak® caps, Shalaks Chemicals) once daily for four months; 440 milligrams of zinc sulfate for up to 24 months; 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate for impotence and hypogonadism in people with hepatic cirrhosis; and 500 milligrams of zinc daily with hydrochlorothiazide. Zinc-L-hydrogen-aspartate solution added to 10 liters of commercially available dialysis concentrate to achieve a plasma zinc concentration of 19.5-25 micromoles per liter has been used. Zinc chloride added to dialysate to achieve a serum zinc concentration of 17% has been used for six weeks. A dose of 150 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily in three divided doses. A dose of 250 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth twice daily for three months. Doses of 66-500 milligrams of zinc sulfate have been taken by mouth daily for 13-26 weeks.

For mouth and throat inflammation, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth once daily after meals for 10 days.

For inflammatory bowel disease, 300 milligrams of zinc aspartate (equal to 60 milligrams of elemental zinc) has been taken by mouth daily for four weeks. In people with ulcerative colitis, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily for 3-4 weeks. 200 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth daily for three months in people with Crohn's disease. Zinc sulfate at a dose of 110 milligrams has been taken by mouth three times daily for eight weeks.

For intestinal malabsorption, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 100 milligrams three times daily; and 19 milligrams daily.

For leg ulcers, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate 1-3 times daily for up to 12 months; 660 milligrams daily; and 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily (duration not specified). The following has been applied to the skin: 250-510 micrograms of zinc oxide per square centimeter in polyvinyl pyrrolidone; zinc oxide dressings (Mezinc™) for eight weeks; gauze compress medicated with zinc oxide (400 micrograms of zinc oxide per square centimeter) for eight weeks; and zinc oxide (400 micrograms of zinc oxide per square centimeter) applied to gauze compresses, changed once daily for 8 weeks.

For leprosy, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth as an adjunct to leprosy medication daily for up to 18 months. Zinc oxide tape (approximately 30%) on leprosy wounds has also been used.

For liver cirrhosis, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 200 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily for two months; 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate twice daily for 12 weeks; and 200 milligrams three times daily for 42-60 days.

For mood disorders, seven milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for 10 weeks.

For muscle cramps in people with cirrhosis, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth twice daily for 12 weeks.

For nickel-positive people, 100 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily for 30 days.

For plaque or gingivitis, the following has been used: a mouthwash with 0.001% zinc twice daily for three weeks; a dentifrice containing 0.5% zinc citrate as a substitute for toothpaste three times daily for 12 weeks; a dentifrice containing 0.5% zinc citrate trihydrate, 0.15% fluoride as sodium monofluorophosphate, silica abrasive, and 0.20% triclosan twice daily in combination with normal brushing for four weeks; and 10 milliliters of an active mouthwash of 0.2% zinc citrate (600 parts per million of zinc) for one minute twice daily for seven days.

For pregnancy, the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc is as follows: 11 milligrams daily for pregnant women 19 years of age and older; or 12 milligrams daily in pregnant women 14-18 years of age. The following doses have been taken by mouth: 14 milligrams of iron and 250 micrograms of folate with 15 milligrams of zinc from week 10-24 of gestation until delivery; 44 milligrams of zinc (Zinclet®, Gunnar Kjems Aps) from <20 weeks of gestation until delivery; 66 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily after breakfast in women who were <20 weeks of gestation until delivery; 30-90 milligrams of zinc gluconate daily starting in the 20th week of pregnancy until delivery; and 22.5 milligrams of zinc as citrate in effervescent tablets for the last 15-25 weeks of pregnancy. A dose of 22.5 milligrams of zinc as citrate in tablets has been taken by mouth for the last 15-25 weeks of pregnancy. Zinc tablets (25 milligrams) have been taken by mouth throughout pregnancy until six weeks following delivery. Doses of 15-62 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily beginning around the middle of the second trimester (16-20 weeks) and continuing until birth. Doses of zinc ranging from 5-90 milligrams have been taken by mouth daily starting from at least 26 weeks' pregnancy.

For psoriasis, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily for up to six months; 50 milligrams of elemental zinc three times daily; and one tablet containing 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate (45 milligrams of elemental zinc) daily after an evening meal for 12 weeks.

For upper respiratory tract infections, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 15 milligrams of zinc gluconate daily (duration unspecified); and 23 milligrams of zinc gluconate lozenges daily as an initial dose of four lozenges, then one lozenge every two hours for seven days.

For rheumatoid arthritis, 200-220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily for up to eight months.

For sexual dysfunction, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate for impotence and hypogonadism in people with hepatic cirrhosis for 6-8 months; 500 milligrams of zinc as a supplement with hydrochlorothiazide for sexual side effects; and 150 milligrams of zinc daily in three divided doses in men undergoing hemodialysis. Doses of 25-50 milligrams of zinc acetate have been taken by mouth for up to six months. Zinc chloride added to dialysate to achieve a serum zinc concentration of 17 percent has been taken for six weeks. A dose of 400 micrograms per liter of zinc chloride in the dialysate has been taken for four weeks. Zinc-L-hydrogen-aspartate solution has been added to 10 liters of commercially available dialysis concentrate over 12 weeks. A dose of 400 micrograms per liter of zinc chloride has been added to the dialysis bath.

For sickle cell anemia management, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily; 50-75 milligrams of zinc daily for up to three years; a solution of 1% zinc sulfate in distilled water; 15 milligrams of zinc as acetate; 25 milligrams every four hours; 15 milligrams of zinc as acetate three times daily for 12 months; and 660 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily. Up to 75 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth once daily for 12 months or 25 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth twice daily for an average of four months.

For skin damage caused by incontinence, zinc oxide oil (concentration and frequency unspecified) has been applied to the skin for 14 days.

For stress, 10 milligrams of elemental zinc has been taken by mouth daily (duration unspecified) in the elderly.

For taste disturbances, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 15-30 milligrams daily (duration unspecified); 140 milligrams of zinc gluconate daily (duration unspecified); 29 milligrams of zinc picolinate three times daily for three months; 100 milligrams of zinc ion for three months; 15 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily for 95 days; 158 milligrams of anhydrous zinc gluconate three times daily for four months; 45 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily after meals; 100 milligrams of zinc ion for three months; 100 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily for 4-6 months; 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily for six weeks or 50 milligrams of zinc acetate in people undergoing hemodialysis. The following intravenous doses of zinc have also been used: 20-100 milliliters of a 4.25% zinc-L-hydrogen aspartate solution added to 10 liters of a commercially available dialysis concentrate to achieve a plasma concentration of 19.5-20.5 micromoles per liter; and 400 micrograms of zinc chloride per liter of dialysate for four weeks. A dose of 100 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth daily for 4-6 months. Doses of 25-100 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily. A dose of 0.2 grams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth three times daily.

For tinea versicolor, 1% lathered zinc pyrithione shampoo has been applied using a long-handled brush to the trunk, arms, and thighs for five minutes prior to taking a shower once daily in the evening for 14 days.

For ringing in the ears, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 22 milligrams of zinc (administered as zinc sulfate in sustained-release tablets) three times daily for eight weeks; 50 milligrams of zinc daily for two months; and 34-68 milligrams of zinc daily for two weeks.

For trichomoniasis (a sexually transmitted disease), 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate has been taken by mouth twice daily for three weeks in people unresponsive to metronidazole.

For ulcers (foot ulcers), zinc hyaluronate gel has been applied once daily to the ulcer surface after cleaning it with physiologic saline solution (dose unspecified).

For viral warts, 10 milligrams of zinc sulfate per kilogram has been taken by mouth daily (up to 600 milligrams daily) for 2-6 months. An ointment containing 20 percent zinc oxide has been applied to the skin twice daily for three months or distilled water containing 5-10 percent zinc sulfate, three times daily for four weeks.

For Wilson's disease, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 25-600 milligrams of zinc 3-5 times daily; and 100-1,200 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily for eight days to 27 years.

Children (under 18 years old)

The current recommended dietary allowance for zinc taken by mouth is: 2 milligrams for 0 to six month-olds; 3 milligrams for seven month-olds to three year-olds; 5 milligrams for 4-8 year-olds; 8 milligrams for 9-13 year-olds; 11 milligrams for males 14-18 years old; 9 milligrams for 14-18 year-old females; 12 milligrams for 14-18 year-old pregnant females; and 13 milligrams for 14-18 year-old breastfeeding females.

For acrodermatitis enteropathica, 525 micromoles of zinc has been used by mouth daily in a 16 year-old male.

For attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 150 milligrams of zinc sulfate sprinkled into a breakfast drink daily for 12 weeks; 55 milligrams of zinc sulfate (containing approximately 15 milligrams of elemental zinc) in addition to one milligram of methylphenidate per kilogram, daily for six weeks; and 30 milligrams of zinc oxide with or without 30 milligrams of iron for six months. Doses of 15-30 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for up to 13 weeks.

For beta-thalassemia, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth, based on age: 22.5-45 milligrams of elemental zinc (for ages 1-4 years); 67.5 milligrams of elemental zinc (for ages 4-10); and 90 milligrams of elemental zinc (for ages 10 and up).

For cognitive function, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 30 milligrams of zinc oxide with or without 30 milligrams of ferrous fumarate for six months; and 30 milligrams of zinc oxide with or without 30 milligrams of iron for six months.

For the common cold, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 10 milligrams of zinc lozenges 5-6 times daily, based on age; one-half of a zinc lozenge (23 milligrams) (Truett Laboratories, TX), for children under 27 kilograms, every two hours, not to exceed six daily; and zinc gluconate glycine lozenges (Cold-EEZE®) four times daily for the duration of the cold. Lozenges containing 10-23 milligrams of zinc gluconate have been taken by mouth every 2 hours or 5-6 times daily until symptoms resolved or syrup containing 15 milligrams of zinc sulfate twice daily for up to ten days.

For cystic fibrosis, tablets containing zinc sulfate (equivalent to 45 milligrams of elemental zinc) have been taken by mouth twice daily for six months, in people 12 and older (children under 12 received half of the dose).

For diaper rash, 10 milligrams of zinc gluconate has been taken by mouth for four months as an adjunct to antifungal cream.

For diarrhea, the World Health Organization and UNICEF recommend short-term zinc supplementation (10-14 days) (20 milligrams of zinc daily or 10 milligrams of zinc daily for infants < 6 months) for the treatment of acute childhood diarrhea. The following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 10-20 milligrams of zinc 1-2 times daily for up to six months; 50-70 milligrams weekly for 12 months; for children aged 3-6 months, 22.5 milligrams of elemental zinc; for children aged 7-60 months, 45 milligrams of elemental zinc daily until the resolution of diarrhea but not exceeding five days; 15 milligrams (for those aged ≤12 months) or 30 milligrams (for those aged >12 months) of elemental zinc daily in three divided doses for 14-30 days; zinc gluconate (10 milligrams of elemental zinc to infants and 20 milligrams to older children); 14.2-40 milligrams of zinc daily in children aged 3-24 months; 20 milligrams of zinc acetate in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) for 14 days; 10 milligrams of zinc in four milliliters of liquid daily for seven months; zinc syrup (15 milligrams of zinc for 6-11 month-old children and 30 milligrams for 12-35 month-old children); multivitamin juice with 15 milligrams of zinc acetate per kilogram of body weight; and 5-20 milligrams daily for the duration of the illness. Doses of 5-45 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth 1-2 times daily for 7-14 days or until the resolution of diarrhea. Doses of 5-70 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily, weekly, or biweekly for 2-72 weeks, as zinc sulfate, zinc gluconate, zinc methionate, and zinc acetate.

For Down syndrome, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: one milligram of zinc sulfate per kilogram of body weight for 2-4 months; 25 milligrams of zinc gluconate daily for children aged 1-9 years and 50 milligrams of zinc gluconate daily for children older than nine years of age, both for 12 months; 20 milligrams of zinc per kilogram daily for two months; and 135 milligrams of zinc daily for two months.

For dysentery, 20 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for two weeks.

For ear infections, 3-70 milligrams of elemental zinc has been taken by mouth daily as zinc sulfate, zinc gluconate, zinc acetate, and zinc chloride for 4-24 months. A formula fortified with 15 milligrams per liter of zinc chloride has been taken by infants daily for 105 days.

For eating disorders, 25 milligrams of zinc as zinc acetate in a solution has been taken daily by mouth 30 minutes before each of three meals for three weeks. Doses of 45-90 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily. Doses of 50-100 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily for six weeks to six months or until a 10 percent increase in body mass index.

For eczema, 22.5 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth three times daily (in sustained-release capsules) for eight weeks.

For growth, 5-20 milligrams of elemental zinc has been taken by mouth daily for up to six months. Doses of 1-20 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily for 8-64 weeks.

For HIV/AIDS, 1.8-2.2 milligrams of zinc per kilogram has been taken by mouth daily for 3-4 weeks. A dose of 10 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth for 6-14.9 months. Doses of 10-100 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily for two weeks to 18 months.

For infant development, 10-20 milligrams of elemental zinc, based on age, has been taken by mouth daily for four months. A minimum of one recommended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc has been taken by mouth as tablets or syrups for 14 days or more within the first month of birth.

For infection, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 30-50 milligrams of zinc five times per week for 12 months for Schistosoma mansoni infection; 20 milligrams of zinc daily with or without 20 milligrams of iron five days per week for one year for episodes of infectious disease.

For kwashiorkor, 2-5 milligrams of zinc per kilogram has been taken by mouth for one week.

For leg ulcers, 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate heptahydrate (50 milligrams elemental zinc) has been taken by mouth daily.

For lower respiratory tract infections, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 10 milligrams of zinc daily for six months; 10 milligrams of zinc sulfate in four milliliters of liquid daily for seven months; 10 milligrams for infants and 20 milligrams for older children for four months; and 10 milligrams of zinc twice daily for five days. Doses of 5-40 milligrams of zinc or zinc sulfate have been taken by mouth 1-2 times daily for up to 12 months. Two teaspoons (35 milligrams of zinc acetate per 5 milliliters) have been taken by mouth once weekly for 12 months. Ten milliliters of a syrup containing a total of 70 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for at least five days. Doses of 20-140 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth weekly in divided doses for 4-18 months.

For malaria, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 12.5 milligrams of zinc sulfate six days per week for six months; 10 milligrams of zinc six days per week for up to 46 weeks; and 20 milligrams of zinc daily for infants and 40 milligrams of zinc daily for older children, each for four days.

For malnutrition, 40 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily in three divided doses. Other doses taken by mouth included 1.5-10 milligrams per kilogram, 6.6 milligrams, or 15 milligrams per liter of zinc daily for up to three months.

For mortality reduction, 5-10 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth, based on age, for a mean of 484.7 days. Doses of 10-20 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth daily to weekly for up to six months.

For parasites, 10 milligrams of zinc as amino acid chelate has been taken by mouth.

For plaque or gingivitis, 0.5% zinc citrate dentifrice has been used in the mouth for three years (frequency unspecified).

For pneumonia, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: two teaspoons (35 milligrams of zinc acetate per five milliliters) once weekly for 12 months; 10-20 milligrams of zinc, based on age, daily for 14 days as an adjuvant to antibiotics; and 10 milligram tablets of zinc sulfate twice daily during hospitalization, along with standard therapy for severe pneumonia.

For shigellosis (adjunct therapy), 20 milligrams of zinc has been taken by mouth daily for two weeks.

For sickle cell anemia management, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 10 milligrams of zinc daily in five milliliters of cherry soup; 660 milligrams of zinc sulfate daily; and 220 milligrams of zinc sulfate three times daily. Doses of 10-66 milligrams of zinc have been taken by mouth 1-3 times daily for up to five years.

For taste disturbances, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 1 milligram of zinc chelate per kilogram daily for three months; and 0.5-0.75 milligrams of zinc sulfate per kilogram daily for six months in people with renal failure.

For taste perception (hemodialysis, cancer), zinc sulfate capsules, containing 15 milligrams of zinc for children <10 years of age or 50 milligrams for adolescents, have been taken by mouth for six weeks (frequency unspecified).

For Wilson's disease, the following doses of zinc have been taken by mouth: 25 milligrams of zinc twice daily for children 1-5 years of age; for people 6-15 years of age, if under 125 pounds of body weight, 25 milligrams of zinc three times daily; 50 milligrams of zinc three times daily for children 16 years and older or over 125 pounds; 35 milligrams of elemental zinc twice daily for children under the age of six; 25 milligrams three times daily for children 7-16 or under 125 pounds of body weight; 50 milligrams three times daily for children older than 16 years of age or over 125 pounds; and D-penicillamine, followed by treatment with 150 milligrams of zinc sulfate, three times daily for the first doses, then 100 milligrams three times daily.

For skin disorders (leishmaniasis), 2 percent zinc sulfate has been injected into lesions.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com