Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to milk or milk products, including cow's milk, sheep's milk, goat's milk, and mare's milk.

Allergic reactions (including diarrhea, failure to thrive, infant colic, rash, and vomiting) have been reported with exposure to whey.

Side Effects and Warnings

Whey protein is likely safe for most adults when used in amounts recommended by the manufacturer.

Whey protein is possibly safe when taken by mouth as a single dose of up to 50 grams, or when 30 grams is taken by mouth daily for six months.

Whey protein may cause abnormal heart rhythms, changes in cholesterol levels, headache, increased diabetes risk, increased fracture or osteoporosis risk, kidney dysfunction, liver damage, stomach or intestine symptoms (acid reflux, bloating, constipation, cramps, gas, increased bowel movements, movement problems, nausea, reduced appetite, swelling of limbs, and upset stomach), and thirst.

Whey protein may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or low blood sugar, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, and medication adjustments may be necessary.

Whey protein may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders or in those taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Whey protein may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's "cytochrome P450" enzyme system.

Whey protein may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people with low blood pressure or in those taking drugs or herbs and supplements that lower blood pressure.

Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

Use cautiously in people who take medications, including agents that affect the immune system and agents that lower cholesterol.

Use cautiously in people with stomach or intestine disorders.

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to milk or milk products, including cow's milk, sheep's milk, goat's milk, and mare's milk.

Avoid in people who are avoiding the use of dairy products.

Avoid using whey protein long-term and in excessive amounts.

Only approved sources of whey protein should be used in infant formulas.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There is a lack of scientific evidence on the use of whey protein during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Only approved sources of whey protein should be used in infant formulas. Allergic reactions have been reported with exposure to whey protein, including diarrhea, failure to thrive, infant colic, and rash.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com