Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to products that contain vitamin E. Skin reactions, including inflammation or itching, have been reported with vitamin E applied to the skin.

Side Effects and Warnings

Vitamin E is likely safe when used in healthy adults at doses commonly found in food, and in healthy people over 65 at doses up to 800 IU taken by mouth daily for up to four months.

Vitamin E is possibly safe in people with diabetes or those using agents that lower blood sugar.

Vitamin E may cause allergic skin reactions (inflammation or itching), blurred vision, changes in cholesterol levels, changes in insulin resistance, diarrhea, dizziness, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, headache, heart conditions, increased risk of death, increased risk of fainting or falls, increased risk of heart failure, increased risk of high blood pressure in pregnancy, increased risk of stroke, increased risk of tuberculosis, kidney dysfunction, nausea, severe response to infection (in preterm babies), sexual dysfunction, stomach pain, vision loss, and weakness.

Use cautiously in smokers and in people with Alzheimer's disease or mental decline, eye damage, kidney problems, heart conditions, and skin conditions.

Use cautiously in preterm babies.

Use cautiously when using long-term (more than 10 years).

Vitamin E may increase the risk of bleeding. Avoid in people with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding.

Avoid using high doses by mouth or high doses injected into the vein.

Avoid using high doses in pregnant women, due to the risk of heart problems in the baby.

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to products that contain vitamin E.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Many prenatal vitamins contain small amounts of vitamin E. Natural forms of vitamin E may be preferred to man-made forms.

Use cautiously in preterm babies. Avoid using high doses in pregnant women, due to the risk of heart problems in the baby.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com