Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (over 18 years old)

Foods that contain vitamin E include eggs, fortified cereals, fruit, green leafy vegetables (such as spinach), meat, nuts, nut oils, poultry, vegetable oils (corn, cottonseed, safflower, soybean, sunflower), argan oil, olive oil, wheat germ oil, and whole grains. Cooking and storage may destroy some of the vitamin E in foods. Most people in the United States obtain vitamin E from the diet, although people with very low-fat diets or intestine disorders may need supplementation. The recommended daily intake for adults over 14 is 15 milligrams (or 22.5 IU); for pregnant women of any age, it is 15 milligrams (or 22.5 IU), and for breastfeeding women of any age, it is 19 milligrams (or 28.5 IU). For adults older than 18 years, pregnant women, and breastfeeding women, the maximum dose is 1,000 milligrams daily (or 1,500 IU).

For age-related macular degeneration, 30 milligrams to 500-600 IU of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) has been taken by mouth daily for 4-8 years.

For amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 1,000 milligrams of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily, as either one daily dose or in two divided doses, for up to 48 weeks.

For clogged arteries, 45-3,200 IU has been taken by mouth daily for up to five years.

For atopic eczema, 600 IU of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol has been taken by mouth daily for 60 days.

For breast cancer, 4-20 milligrams has been taken by mouth daily.

For cancer, 4-800 milligrams of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily for up to 10 years.

For heart disease, 33-3,200 IU has been taken by mouth daily or on alternate days for up to 10 years. Doses of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol ranging from 50-2,000 milligrams and doses of RRR-alpha-tocopherol ranging from 272-800 milligrams have been taken by mouth daily for up to 6.6 years.

For heart disease in people undergoing kidney disease treatment, 800 IU has been taken by mouth daily for 519 days.

For cataract prevention, 300-600 IU of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily for up to six years, with conflicting results. Doses of 50-300 milligrams have been taken by mouth daily or on alternate days for 3.6-9.7 years.

For chemotherapy side effects, 200-600 milligrams to 1,600-3,200 IU of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily. A dose of 400 milligrams of vitamin E oil or dressing has been applied to the skin. A dose of 200 milligrams of alpha-tocopherol has been injected into the muscle.

For colorectal cancer prevention, 30-600 milligrams of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily or every other day for 1-12 years.

For dementia/Alzheimer's disease, 800-2,000 IU of Vitamin E has been taken by mouth 1-2 times daily for 2-3 years, with mixed results.

For diabetes, 400-600 IU vitamin E has been taken by mouth once daily for 1.5-8 years.

For leg pain due to clogged arteries, 300-1,600 milligrams of Vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily for up to 18 months.

For liver disease (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), 30-1,000 IU of vitamin E has been taken by mouth 1-2 times daily for two months to five years.

For lung cancer, 50 milligrams or 400-600 milligrams of alpha-tocopherol has been taken by mouth 1-2 times daily or every other day for 2-8 years.

For reducing risk of death, 16.5-5,500 IU of Vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily or every other day for up to 10 years, without benefit. A dose of 100 milligrams of vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate) or 200 IU vitamin E (dl-alpha-tocopherol) has been taken daily for 1-6 years.

For Parkinson's disease, 2,000-3,200 IU has been taken by mouth daily, without benefit.

For prostate cancer prevention, 50 milligrams or 400 IU of vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily or every other day for a follow-up of 5-8 years.

For stroke prevention, 50-800 milligrams of Vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily for greater than 10 years, without benefit.

For tardive dyskinesia, 400-1,600 IU of Vitamin E has been taken by mouth daily for up to one year.

Treatment of vitamin E deficiency should be under medical supervision. If the cause is due to poor nutrition, taking a dose by mouth that is 2-5 times greater than the RDA may be considered. If the cause is stomach or intestine problems, then injections of vitamin E may be needed.

For scar prevention, vitamin E has been applied to the skin, without benefit.

Children (under 18 years old)

Common formulas used in children are alpha-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol acetate, and tocofersolan. The recommended intakes are as follows: for healthy breastfeeding infants 0-6 months old, 4 milligrams daily (6 IU); for infants 7-12 months old, 5 milligrams daily (7.5 IU); for children 1-3 years old, 6 milligrams daily (9 IU); for those 4-8 years old, 7 milligrams daily (10.5 IU); for those 9-13 years old, 11 milligrams daily (16.5 IU); for those over 14 or pregnant women of any age, 15 milligrams daily (22.5 IU); and for breastfeeding women of any age, 19 milligrams daily (28.5 IU).

For kidney disease, 400 IU (if weight was less than 30 kilograms) or 800 IU (if weight was more than 30 kilograms) has been taken by mouth for two years.

For liver disease, 17-200 milligrams per kilogram of d-alpha-tocopherol has been taken by mouth daily.

For supplementation in preterm and very low birth weight infants, 10-25 milligrams per kilogram have been injected into the muscle daily starting within 8-24 hours of birth and continued up to 30 days after. These doses have been accompanied by doses of 15-20 milligrams per kilogram injected into the vein, sometimes followed by 15-200 milligrams taken by mouth daily started after at least three days of life.

Treatment of vitamin E deficiency should be under medical supervision. Vitamin E absorption may improve if given with meals and in small doses.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com