Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to any ingredient in vitamin B6 products.

Side Effects and Warnings

Vitamin B6 is likely safe when taken by mouth in recommended daily intake amounts. The recommended daily intake of vitamin B6 is as follows for adults: 1.3 milligrams in men and women ages 19-50; 1.7 milligrams in men aged 51 and older; and 1.3 milligrams in women aged 51 older. The recommended daily intake of vitamin B6 is as follows for children: 0.1 milligrams for babies aged 0-6 months; 0.3 milligrams for babies aged 7-12 months; 0.5 milligrams for children aged 1-3 years; 0.6 milligrams for children aged 4-8 years; 1 milligram for children aged 9-13 years; 1 milligram for males aged 14-18 years; and 1.2 milligrams for females aged 14-18 years.

Vitamin B6 may cause abnormal heart rhythms, acne, allergic reactions, breast enlargement or soreness, changes in folic acid levels, decreased muscle tone, drowsiness or sedation, feeling of a lump in the throat, feeling of tingling on the skin, headache, heartburn, loss of appetite, nausea, rash, recurrence of ulcerative colitis (an inflammatory bowel disorder), stomach discomfort or pain, sun sensitivity, vomiting, and worsened asthma.

Side effects to some ingredients of high-dose pyridoxine hydrochloride (which is injected into the vein) are possible.

Vitamin B6 may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people with blood pressure disorders or in those taking drugs or herbs and supplements that lower blood pressure.

Vitamin B6 may affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or low blood sugar, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, and medication adjustments may be necessary.

Vitamin B6 may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Use cautiously in people who have heart conditions or stomach and intestine conditions.

Use cautiously in people taking agents for Parkinson's disease, as they may interact with vitamin B6.

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to any ingredient in vitamin B6 products.

Avoid in doses higher than 200 milligrams daily, due to the risk of nerve pain and seizures.

Avoid high doses during pregnancy or breastfeeding. A special product has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use during pregnancy, but it should not be used long-term or in high doses without the guidance of a medical provider, due to the risk of seizures in infants.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Vitamin B6 is likely safe for pregnant and breastfeeding women when taken by mouth in doses not exceeding the recommended daily intake.

Avoid high doses during pregnancy or breastfeeding. A special product has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use during pregnancy, but it should not be used long-term or in high doses without the guidance of a medical provider, due to the risk of seizures in infants.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com