Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (18 years and older)

The following doses are the U.S. recommended daily allowance (RDA) of thiamine taken by mouth: in adults 19 and older, 1.2 milligrams for males and 1.1 milligrams for females; and in pregnant or breastfeeding women of any age, 1.4 milligrams. Doses of 1-2 milligrams have been taken by mouth daily as a dietary supplement in adults. In people who have or are at risk of thiamine deficiency, 50 milligrams of thiamine have been taken by mouth daily, and doses of 50-100 milligrams of thiamine have been injected into the vein 3-4 times daily.

For Alzheimer's disease, 3 milligrams of thiamine has been taken by mouth daily in three divided doses for up to one year.

For menstrual cramps, 100 milligrams of thiamine has been taken by mouth daily for three months.

For epilepsy, 50 milligrams of thiamine has been taken by mouth daily for six months.

For alcohol withdrawal, 100 milligrams of thiamine hydrochloride has been injected into the muscle or vein.

For alcohol liver disease, 100 milligrams of thiamine has been injected into the vein.

For coma or hypothermia (dangerously low body temperature) of unknown origin, 100 milligrams of thiamine has been injected into the muscle or vein.

For thiamine deficiency caused by nutrition delivered through the vein, 100 milligrams of thiamine has been injected into the vein.

For Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (a brain disorder caused by thiamine deficiency), 5-200 milligrams of thiamine have been injected into the muscle or vein, sometimes in divided doses for over two days, or at least 100 milligrams of thiamine has been injected into the vein or muscle.

Children (younger than 18 years)

The following doses of thiamine taken by mouth are considered to be adequate intake (AI): 0.2 milligrams in infants 0-6 months old; 0.3 milligrams in infants 7-12 months old; 0.5 milligrams in children 1-3 years old; 0.6 milligrams in children 4-8 years old; 0.9 milligrams in children 9-13 years old; 1.2 milligrams in males 14-18 years old; and 1 milligram in females 14-18 years old. The RDA for pregnant or breastfeeding women of any age is 1.4 milligrams daily.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com