Precautions

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check your progress closely while you are using this medicine to see if it is working properly and to check for unwanted effects. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. If you are sexually active, use 2 forms of effective birth control together to avoid pregnancy. You should begin using birth control 4 weeks before you start therapy. Continue the birth control during therapy, even if the dose is stopped for a short time, and for at least 4 weeks after your last dose. Talk to your doctor about the most effective forms of birth control for you and your partner. Call your doctor right away if you think you are pregnant.

Women who can get pregnant must have a negative pregnancy test before starting therapy. Pregnancy tests may be done weekly for the first month during therapy, and then every 2 to 4 weeks.

Men who are sexually active must protect their female partner from getting pregnant. Thalidomide will appear in the semen of male patients. If you are sexually active, you must use a latex or synthetic condom every time you have sex with a woman who could get pregnant. If you have had a vasectomy, you still have to use a latex condom during sex. You must use a condom during therapy, even if the dose is stopped for a short time, and for at least 4 weeks after your last dose. Call your doctor right away if you think your sexual partner may be pregnant.

Do not donate blood or sperm while you are taking this medicine and for at least 4 weeks after your last dose.

You must not share this medicine with anyone, even someone who has similar symptoms.

This medicine may cause blood clots, heart attack, or stroke. Check with your doctor right away if you have shortness of breath, chest pain, or leg pain or swelling. These could be symptoms of blood clots. Symptoms of stroke include confusion, difficulty with speaking, double vision, inability to move the arms, legs, or facial muscles, or slow speech.

This medicine may cause you to feel dizzy, drowsy, or lightheaded. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert. If you feel lightheaded, getting up slowing after sitting or lying down may help.

This medicine may lower your white blood cells and you may get infections more easily. Avoid people who are sick and wash your hands often.

This medicine may cause nerve damage. Check with your doctor right away if you have tingling, burning, numbness, or pain in your hands or feet. These could be symptoms of a nerve condition called peripheral neuropathy.

Serious skin reactions can occur with this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, red skin lesions, severe acne or a skin rash, sores or ulcers on the skin, or fever or chills while you are using this medicine.

Thalidomide may cause a serious type of reaction called tumor lysis syndrome in patients with multiple myeloma. Call your doctor right away if you have less urine than normal, joint pain, stiffness, or swelling, lower back, side, or stomach pain, a rapid weight gain, swelling of the feet or lower legs, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

This medicine will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that may make you drowsy or less alert). Some examples of CNS depressants are antihistamines or medicines for hay fever, allergies, or colds, sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine, prescription pain medicine or narcotics, medicine for seizures or barbiturates, muscle relaxants, or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of these medicines while you are using thalidomide.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (eg, St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.