Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (18 years and older)

Due to reports of severe side effects, it is strongly recommended that tea tree oil not be taken by mouth. Although tea tree oil solution has been used as a mouthwash, it should not be swallowed. In addition, there is no proven effective dose of tea tree oil.

For dental plague/gingivitis, 2.5% tea tree oil has been used to brush teeth twice daily for eight weeks.

For acne, 5% tea tree oil as a gel has been applied to the skin once daily for three months or twice daily for 20 minutes, then washed off, for 45 days.

For allergic skin reactions, 25-120 microliters of 20-100% tea tree oil has been applied to the affected areas of the skin.

For dandruff, 5% tea tree oil shampoo has been applied to the scalp for three minutes daily, prior to a rinse, for four weeks.

For eye infections, 50% tea tree oil has been used as a weekly eyelid scrub or tea tree shampoo has been used a daily eyelid scrub for six weeks.

For methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a 4% tea tree oil nasal ointment and a 5% tea tree oil body wash has been used for an unspecified duration. A 10% tea tree cream has been applied to the nostrils three times daily for five days followed by a 5% tea tree body wash used on the body for a minimum of once daily for five days. A 10% tea tree cream was applied to skin wounds and lesions as an alternative to the body wash. A 3.3% tea tree oil water-mixture has been used during each wound cleaning and dressing change.

For fungal nail infections, 100% tea tree oil has been applied to the affected areas twice daily for six months.

For genital herpes, a 6% tea tree oil gel has been applied to the affected skin five times daily.

For thrush, an alcohol-based or alcohol-free tea tree solution has been used four times daily as a mouthwash for 2-4 weeks. For denture inflammation, one milliliter of tea tree oil has been added to the standard treatment of a five milliliter dose of Coe-Comfort™ tissue conditioner; this mixture has been used by mouth. Daily treatment information is unknown, but it has been used for 12 days.

For athlete's foot, 10% tea tree oil has been applied to the affected area twice daily after washing and drying feet. A 25-50% tea tree oil solution has been applied to the affected area twice daily for up to four weeks.

For vaginal infections, a 20% solution of tea tree oil has been applied by using a tea tree soaked tampon for 24 hours. A dose of 200 milligrams of tea tree oil vaginal pessaries in a vegetable oil base has been used daily for five days.

Children (younger than 18 years)

Due to reports of severe side effects, it is strongly recommended that tea tree oil not be taken by mouth. Although tea tree oil solution has been used as a mouthwash, it should not be swallowed. In addition, there is no proven effective dose of tea tree oil.

For eye infections, eyelid scrubs of 50% tea tree oil or eyelid massages with 5% tea tree ointment have been performed for 4-6 weeks.

For skin infections, a four microliter drop of tea tree oil plus iodine or tea tree oil alone has been used twice daily for up to 30 days or until the lesions healed.

For viral warts, tea tree oil was applied to warts once daily for 12 days.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com