Before Using

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

In deciding to receive a diagnostic test, the risks of taking the test must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For these tests, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Although there is no specific information comparing use of radiopaque agents in children with use in other age groups, these agents are not expected to cause different side effects or problems in children than they do in adults when used in the bladder or ureters. There is no specific information about the use of radiopaque agents in children for studies of the uterus or fallopian tubes.

Geriatric

Many medicines have not been studied specifically in older people. Therefore, it may not be known whether they work exactly the same way they do in younger adults. Although there is no specific information comparing use of radiopaque agents for instillation into the bladder or ureters or into the uterus and fallopian tubes in the elderly with use in other age groups, these agents are not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than they do in younger adults.

Pregnancy

Studies on effects in pregnancy when radiopaque agents are instilled into the bladder or ureters have not been done in women. Studies in animals have been done only with iothalamate, which has not been shown to cause birth defects or other problems.

Diagnostic tests of the uterus and fallopian tubes using radiopaque agents are not recommended during pregnancy or for at least 6 months after a pregnancy has ended. The test may cause other problems, such as infection in the uterus.

Also, radiopaque agents containing iodine have, on rare occasions, caused hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) in the baby when they were injected into the amniotic sac late in the pregnancy. In addition, x-rays of the abdomen during pregnancy may have harmful effects on the fetus. Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or if you suspect that you may be pregnant when you are to receive this radiopaque agent.

Breastfeeding

Although small amounts of radiopaque agents are absorbed into the body and may pass into the breast milk, these agents have not been shown to cause problems in nursing babies. However, it may be necessary for you to stop breast-feeding temporarily after receiving a radiopaque agent. Be sure you have discussed this with your doctor.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. Tell your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicine.

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of diagnostic tests in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Acute kidney problems due to a severe liver disorder (hepato-renal syndrome [HRS]) or
  • Acute kidney problems before, during, or after a liver transplant or
  • Severe kidney problems, acute or chronic—The use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) should be avoided in patients with severe kidney problems. The risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a very serious disease affecting the skin, muscle, and internal organs, may be increased .
  • Asthma, hay fever, or other allergies (history of) or
  • Reaction to a skin test for allergies or to penicillins—If you have a history of these conditions, there is a greater chance of having a reaction, such as an allergic reaction, to the radiopaque agent.
  • Enlarged prostate—There may be blockage that makes it difficult or impossible to put the solution of the radiopaque agent into the bladder or ureters.
  • Genital tract infection or
  • Urinary tract infection—The risk of complications is greater in patients with these conditions.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (severe)—The condition may be aggravated by this test.