Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

To make the use of a progestin as safe and reliable as possible, you should understand how and when to take it and what effects may be expected. Progestins usually come with patient directions. Read them carefully before taking or using this medicine.

Take this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may increase the chance of side effects. Try to take the medicine at the same time each day to reduce the possibility of side effects and to allow it to work better.

Progestins are often given together with certain medicines. If you are using a combination of medicines, make sure that you take each one at the proper time and do not mix them. Ask your health care professional to help you plan a way to remember to take your medicines at the right times.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For medroxyprogesterone

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For controlling unusual and heavy bleeding of the uterus (dysfunctional uterine bleeding) or treating unusual stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhea):
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 milligrams (mg) per day for five to ten days as directed by your doctor.
    • For preparing the uterus for the menstrual period:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 milligrams (mg) per day for five or ten days as directed by your doctor.
    • For preventing estrogen from thickening the lining of the uterus (endometrial hyperplasia) when taking estrogen for ovarian hormone therapy in postmenopausal women:
      • Adults—When taking estrogen each day on Days 1 through 25: Oral, 5 to 10 milligrams (mg) of medroxyprogesterone per day for ten to fourteen or more days each month as directed by your doctor. Or, your doctor may want you to take 2.5 or 5 mg per day without stopping. Your doctor will help decide the number of tablets that is best for you and when to take them.
  • For intramuscular injection dosage form:
    • For treating cancer of the kidneys or uterus:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 400 to 1000 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle as a single dose once a week. Then, your doctor may lower your dose to 400 mg or more once a month.
  • For subcutaneous injection dosage form:
    • For treating pain related to endometriosis:
      • Adults and teenagers—104 milligrams (mg) injected under the skin of the anterior thigh or abdomen every three months (12 to 14 weeks) for not more than 2 years.

For megestrol

  • For oral dosage form (suspension):
    • For treating loss of appetite (anorexia), muscles (cachexia), or weight caused by acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS):
      • Adults and teenagers—800 milligrams (mg) a day for the first month. Then your doctor may want you to take 400 or 800 mg a day for three more months.
  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For treating cancer of the breast:
      • Adults and teenagers—160 milligrams (mg) a day as a single dose or in divided doses for two or more months.
    • For treating cancer of the uterus:
      • Adults and teenagers—40 to 320 milligrams (mg) a day for two or more months.
    • For treating loss of appetite (anorexia), muscles (cachexia), or weight caused by cancer:
      • Adults and teenagers—400 to 800 milligrams (mg) a day.

For norethindrone

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For controlling unusual and heavy bleeding of the uterus (dysfunctional uterine bleeding) or treating unusual stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhea):
      • Adults and teenagers—2.5 to 10 milligrams (mg) a day from Day 5 through Day 25 (counting from the first day of the last menstrual cycle). Or, your doctor may want you to take the medicine only for five to ten days as directed.
    • For treating endometriosis:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) a day for two weeks. Then, your doctor may increase your dose slowly up to 15 mg a day for six to nine months. Let your doctor know if your menstrual period starts. Your doctor may want you to take more of the medicine or may want you to stop taking the medicine for a short period of time.

For progesterone

  • For oral dosage form (capsules):
    • For preventing estrogen from thickening the lining of the uterus (endometrial hyperplasia) when taking estrogen for ovarian hormone therapy in postmenopausal women:
      • Adults—200 milligrams (mg) per day at bedtime for 12 continuous days per 28-day cycle of estrogen treatment each month.
    • For treating unusual stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhea):
      • Adults—400 milligrams (mg) per day at bedtime for ten days.
  • For vaginal dosage form (gel):
    • For treating unusual stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhea):
      • Adults and teenagers—45 milligrams (mg) (one applicatorful of 4% gel) once every other day for up to six doses. Dose may be increased to 90 mg (one applicatorful of 8% gel) once every other day for up to six doses if needed.
    • For use with infertility procedures:
      • Adults and teenagers—90 milligrams (mg) (one applicatorful of 8% gel) one or two times a day. If pregnancy occurs, treatment can continue for up to ten to twelve weeks.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For controlling unusual and heavy bleeding of the uterus (dysfunctional uterine bleeding) or treating unusual stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhea):
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 milligrams (mg) a day injected into a muscle for six to ten days. Or, your doctor may want you to receive 100 or 150 mg injected into a muscle as a single dose. Sometimes your doctor may want you first to take another hormone called estrogen. If your menstrual period starts, your doctor will want you to stop taking the medicine.
  • For vaginal dosage form (suppositories):
    • For maintaining a pregnancy (at ovulation and at the beginning of pregnancy):
      • Adults and teenagers—25 mg to 100 milligrams (mg) (one suppository) inserted into the vagina one or two times a day beginning near the time of ovulation. Your doctor may want you to receive the medicine for up to eleven weeks.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

For all progestins, except for progesterone capsules for postmenopausal women: If you miss a dose of this medicine, take the missed dose as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

For progesterone capsules for postmenopausal women: If you miss a dose of 200 mg of progesterone capsules at bedtime, take 100 mg in the morning then go back to your regular dosing schedule. If you take 300 mg of progesterone a day and you miss your morning and evening doses, you should not take the missed dose. Return to your regular dosing schedule.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.