Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

  • This medicine may be taken with food or a full glass (8 ounces) of water or milk to reduce stomach irritation.
  • If your medicine comes in a dropper bottle, measure each dose with the special dropper provided with your prescription and dilute it in a small glass (4 ounces) of orange or grapefruit juice or water just before taking it.
  • If you are taking the extended-release capsule form of this medicine, each dose should be swallowed whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

For patients using the suppository form of this medicine:

  • If the suppository is too soft to insert, chill it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or run cold water over it before removing the foil wrapper.
  • To insert the suppository: First remove the foil wrapper and moisten the suppository with cold water. Lie down on your side and use your finger to push the suppository well up into the rectum.
  • Do not take more or less of this medicine and do not take it more or less often than your doctor ordered.
  • Not taking more than your doctor ordered is particularly important for children or elderly patients, since they may react very strongly to this medicine.

This medicine must be taken for several weeks before its full effect is reached when it is used to treat mental and emotional conditions.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For chlorpromazine

  • For oral extended-release capsule dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—30 to 300 milligrams (mg) one to three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
  • For oral concentrate, syrup, or tablet dosage forms:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 10 to 25 mg two to four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 to 25 mg every four to six hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 to 25 mg every four to six hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For sedation before surgery:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg two to three hours before surgery.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight or size, and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, two to three hours before surgery.
    • For treatment of hiccups:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg three or four times a day. If hiccups remain after two to three days of oral treatment, treatment by injection may be needed.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For porphyria:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 mg three or four times a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For severe mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated in one hour, and every three to twelve hours thereafter. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults—At first, 25 mg injected into a muscle. If needed, doses of 25 to 50 mg may be given every three to four hours.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting during surgery:
      • Adults—At first, 12.5 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated if needed. Or up to 25 mg may be diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight or size and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.275 mg per kg (0.125 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle or diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For sedation before surgery:
      • Adults—12.5 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle one to two hours before surgery.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle one to two hours before surgery.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For treatment of hiccups:
      • Adults—25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle three or four times a day. If hiccups remain after treatment by injection into muscle, 25 to 50 mg may be diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For porphyria:
      • Adults—25 mg injected into a muscle every six to eight hours.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For tetanus:
      • Adults—25 to 50 mg, injected into a muscle three or four times a day. Or 25 to 50 mg, diluted and injected slowly into a vein. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kg (0.25 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle every six to eight hours or diluted and injected slowly into a vein.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For rectal dosage form (suppositories):
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—50 to 100 mg, inserted into the rectum every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children 6 months to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 1 mg per kg (0.45 mg per pound) of body weight, inserted into the rectum every six to eight hours as needed.
      • Children up to 6 months of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For fluphenazine

  • For oral dosage form (elixir, solution, or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, a total of 2.5 to 10 milligrams (mg) a day, taken in smaller doses every six to eight hours during the day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day.
      • Children—0.25 to 0.75 mg one to four times a day.
      • Older adults—1 to 2.5 mg a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
  • For long-acting decanoate injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 12.5 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every one to three weeks. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 100 mg.
      • Children 12 years of age and older—At first, 6.25 to 18.75 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin once a week. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg every one to three weeks.
      • Children 5 to 12 years of age—3.125 to 12.5 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every one to three weeks.
  • For long-acting enanthate injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 25 mg, injected into a muscle or under the skin every two weeks. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 100 mg.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For short-acting hydrochloride injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 1.25 mg, injected into a muscle. Your doctor may repeat and increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Older adults—1 to 2.5 mg a day, injected into a muscle. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.

For mesoridazine

  • For oral dosage form (solution or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 milligrams (mg) three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated in thirty to sixty minutes if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For pericyazine

  • For oral dosage form (capsules or solution):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) taken in the morning, and 10 mg taken in the evening. Your doctor may change your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg taken in the morning and 40 mg taken in the evening.
      • Children 5 years of age and older—2.5 to 10 mg taken in the morning, and 5 to 30 mg taken in the evening.
      • Children up to 5 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Older adults—At first, 5 mg a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 30 mg a day.

For perphenazine

  • For oral dosage form (solution):
    • For mental or emotional disorders in hospitalized patients:
      • Adults and teenagers—8 to 16 milligrams (mg) two to four times a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For oral dosage form (tablet):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—4 to 16 mg two to four times a day.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—A total of 8 to 16 mg a day, taken in smaller doses during the day. Your doctor will lower your dose as soon as possible.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg injected into a muscle every six hours.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 to 10 mg injected into a muscle, or 5 mg diluted and injected slowly into a vein. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For pipotiazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders in hospitalized patients:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 to 100 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle every two to three weeks. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg every four weeks.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For prochlorperazine

  • For long-acting oral dosage form (extended-release capsules):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 15 mg taken once a day in the morning, or 10 mg taken every twelve hours. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children—This dosage form is not recommended for use in children.
  • For oral dosage forms (solution or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 to 10 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—2.5 mg two or three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, for children 2 through 5 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day. For children 6 to 12 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg three or four times a day.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 mg taken one to three times a day.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 10 to 20 mg injected into a muscle. The dose may be repeated if needed. Later, the dose is usually 10 to 20 mg every four to six hours. However, the dose usually is not more than 200 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.132 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.06 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose for children 2 through 5 years of age usually is not more than 20 mg a day. The dose for children 6 to 12 years of age usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle every three to four hours as needed. Or 2.5 to 10 mg injected slowly into a vein. The dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.132 mg per kg (0.06 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose for children 2 through 5 years of age usually is not more than 20 mg a day. The dose for children 6 to 12 years of age usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting in surgery:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle or injected slowly into a vein. The dose may be repeated if needed. However, the total dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For rectal dosage form (suppositories):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—10 mg inserted into the rectum three or four times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—2.5 mg inserted into the rectum two or three times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, for children 2 through 5 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day. For children 6 to 12 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg a day.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—25 mg inserted into the rectum two times a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 2.5 mg inserted into the rectum one to three times a day.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For promazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults—At first, 50 to 150 mg, injected into a muscle or, in hospitalized patients, diluted and injected into a vein. Later, 10 to 200 mg, injected into a muscle every four to six hours.
      • Children 12 years of age and older—10 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle, every four to six hours.
      • Children up to 12 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For thioproperazine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 11 years of age and older—At first, a total of 1 to 3 mg a day taken all at one time in a single dose each day or divided and taken in smaller doses several times during the day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children 3 through 10 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For thioridazine

  • For oral dosage forms (suspension, solution, or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 to 100 milligrams (mg) one to three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 800 mg a day.
      • Children 2 to 12 years of age—At first, 10 to 25 mg two or three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose, if needed, based on body weight or size.
      • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For trifluoperazine

  • For oral dosage forms (syrup or tablets):
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 2 to 5 milligrams (mg) one or two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day.
      • Children 6 to 12 years of age—At first, 1 mg one or two times a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—1 to 2 mg, injected into a muscle every four to six hours as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children 6 to 12 years of age—1 mg injected into a muscle one or two times a day.
      • Children up to 6 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For triflupromazine

  • For injection dosage form:
    • For mental or emotional disorders:
      • Adults and teenagers—60 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 150 mg a day.
      • Children 2½ years of age and older—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.2 to 0.25 mg per kilogram (kg) (0.09 to 0.11 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2½ years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For nausea and vomiting:
      • Adults and teenagers—5 to 15 mg injected into a muscle every four hours, as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 60 mg a day injected into a muscle. Or 1 mg injected into a vein, the dose being repeated as needed. However, the dose usually is not more than 3 mg a day injected into a vein.
      • Children 2½ years of age and older—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The usual dose is 0.2 to 0.25 mg per kg (0.09 to 0.11 mg per pound) of body weight, injected into a muscle. However, the dose usually is not more than 10 mg a day.
      • Children up to 2½ years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

Call your doctor or pharmacist for instructions.

If you miss a dose of this medicine and your dosing schedule is:

  • One dose a day—Take the missed dose as soon as possible. Then go back to your regular dosing schedule. However, if you do not remember the missed dose until the next day, skip it and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses
  • More than one dose a day—If you remember within an hour or so of the missed dose, take it right away. However, if you do not remember until later, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.