Description and Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

US Brand Name

  1. Sandostatin
  2. Sandostatin LAR Depot

Descriptions


Octreotide injection is used to treat severe diarrhea and other symptoms that occur with certain intestinal tumors or metastatic carcinoid tumors (tumors that has already spread in the body). It does not cure the tumor but it helps the patient feel more comfortable.

Octreotide injection is also used to treat a condition called acromegaly, which is caused by too much growth hormone in the body. Too much growth hormone produced in adults causes the hands, feet, and parts of the face to become large, thick, and bulky. Other problems such as arthritis also can develop. Octreotide works by reducing the amount of growth hormone that is produced by the body.

Octreotide may also be used for other medical conditions as determined by your doctor.

Octreotide is available only with your doctor's prescription

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Powder for Suspension
  • Powder for Solution
  • Solution

Before Using

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of the short-acting form of octreotide injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been demonstrated.

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of the long-acting form of octreotide injection in children 6 to 17 years of age.

Geriatric

Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of octreotide have not been performed in the geriatric population, geriatric-specific problems are not expected to limit the usefulness of octreotide injection in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney, liver, or heart problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving octreotide injection.

Pregnancy

Information about this octreotide-injection-route-intramuscular-route
Pregnancy Category Explanation
All Trimesters B Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breastfeeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Amifampridine
  • Bepridil
  • Cisapride
  • Dronedarone
  • Levomethadyl
  • Mesoridazine
  • Pimozide
  • Piperaquine
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Terfenadine
  • Thioridazine
  • Ziprasidone

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acecainide
  • Acetophenazine
  • Ajmaline
  • Amiodarone
  • Amisulpride
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amoxapine
  • Apomorphine
  • Aprindine
  • Arsenic Trioxide
  • Asenapine
  • Astemizole
  • Azimilide
  • Azithromycin
  • Bretylium
  • Chloral Hydrate
  • Chloroquine
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Citalopram
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clomipramine
  • Clozapine
  • Crizotinib
  • Cyclosporine
  • Dabrafenib
  • Dasatinib
  • Desipramine
  • Dibenzepin
  • Disopyramide
  • Dofetilide
  • Dolasetron
  • Domperidone
  • Doxepin
  • Droperidol
  • Encainide
  • Enflurane
  • Erythromycin
  • Escitalopram
  • Ethopropazine
  • Fingolimod
  • Flecainide
  • Fluconazole
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluphenazine
  • Foscarnet
  • Gatifloxacin
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Granisetron
  • Halofantrine
  • Haloperidol
  • Halothane
  • Hydroquinidine
  • Ibutilide
  • Iloperidone
  • Imipramine
  • Isoflurane
  • Isradipine
  • Ivabradine
  • Ketoconazole
  • Lapatinib
  • Levofloxacin
  • Lidoflazine
  • Lopinavir
  • Lorcainide
  • Lumefantrine
  • Mefloquine
  • Methadone
  • Methotrimeprazine
  • Mifepristone
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Nilotinib
  • Norfloxacin
  • Nortriptyline
  • Ofloxacin
  • Ondansetron
  • Paliperidone
  • Pazopanib
  • Pentamidine
  • Perflutren Lipid Microsphere
  • Perphenazine
  • Pipotiazine
  • Pirmenol
  • Posaconazole
  • Prajmaline
  • Probucol
  • Procainamide
  • Prochlorperazine
  • Promazine
  • Promethazine
  • Propafenone
  • Propiomazine
  • Protriptyline
  • Quetiapine
  • Quinidine
  • Quinine
  • Ranolazine
  • Risperidone
  • Salmeterol
  • Saquinavir
  • Sematilide
  • Sertindole
  • Sevoflurane
  • Sodium Phosphate
  • Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic
  • Sodium Phosphate, Monobasic
  • Solifenacin
  • Sorafenib
  • Sotalol
  • Spiramycin
  • Sulfamethoxazole
  • Sultopride
  • Sunitinib
  • Tedisamil
  • Telavancin
  • Telithromycin
  • Tetrabenazine
  • Thiethylperazine
  • Toremifene
  • Trazodone
  • Trifluoperazine
  • Triflupromazine
  • Trimeprazine
  • Trimethoprim
  • Trimipramine
  • Vandetanib
  • Vardenafil
  • Vasopressin
  • Vemurafenib
  • Vinflunine
  • Voriconazole
  • Zolmitriptan
  • Zotepine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Pegvisomant

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Cholangitis (inflammation or swelling of the bile duct) or
  • Congestive heart failure or
  • Gallbladder disease or
  • Gallstones, or history of or
  • Heart rhythm problems (e.g., arrhythmia, QT prolongation, slow heartbeat) or
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation or swelling of the pancreas) or
  • Thyroid problems or
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Diabetes—Octreotide may cause high or low blood sugar. Your doctor may need to change the dose of your insulin or diabetes medicine.
  • Kidney disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use

This medicine is given as a shot under your skin, into a muscle or vein.

A nurse or other trained health professional may give you this medicine or this medicine may be given at home to patients who do not need to be in the hospital or clinic. If you are using this medicine at home, your doctor or nurse will teach you how to prepare and inject the medicine. Be sure that you understand how to use the medicine.

You will be shown the body areas where this shot can be given. Use a different body area each time you give yourself a shot. Keep track of where you give each shot to make sure you rotate body areas.

You might not use all of the medicine in each ampul or vial (glass container). Do not save an opened ampul or vial. If the medicine in the ampul or vial has changed color, or if you see particles in it, do not use it.

Some patients may feel pain, stinging, tingling, or burning sensations at the place where they inject the medicine. Injecting the medicine after it has been warmed to room temperature rather than cold from the refrigerator may reduce the discomfort. However, do not use heat to warm it faster because heat can destroy the medicine.

Put used needles and syringes in a puncture-resistant disposable container or dispose of them as directed by your doctor. Do not reuse needles and syringes.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For long-acting injection dosage form:
    • For treatment of acromegaly:
      • Adults—At first, 20 milligrams (mg) injected into the gluteal muscle once every 4 weeks for 3 months. Your doctor will adjust your as needed and tolerated.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For treatment of severe diarrhea and other symptoms that occur with certain types of intestinal tumors:
      • Adults and teenagers—At first, 20 milligrams (mg) injected into the gluteal muscle once every 4 weeks for 2 months. Your doctor will adjust your as needed and tolerated.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For short-acting injection dosage form:
    • For treatment of acromegaly:
      • Adults—At first, 50 micrograms (mcg) injected under the skin or into a vein three times a day. Your doctor will adjust your dose as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For treatment of carcinoid tumors:
      • Adults—At first, 100 to 600 micrograms (mcg) per day, divided into two or four doses and injected under the skin for the first 2 weeks. Your doctor will adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 1500 mcg per day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For treatment of severe diarrhea that occurs with certain types of intestinal tumors:
      • Adults—At first, 200 to 300 micrograms (mcg) per day, divided into two or four doses and injected under the skin for the first 2 weeks. Your doctor will adjust your dose as needed.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

If you miss a dose of the long-acting form of this medicine, contact your doctor.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Store in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Ampules of the short-acting form of octreotide injection may be kept at room temperature for 14 days when they are protected from light. If the ampuls are not protected from light, problems with the solution can develop much sooner.

Precautions

It is very important that your doctor check you closely while you are receiving this medicine. This is to make sure that this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check your progress

Make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. You must use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant. Talk to your doctor about effective birth control.

This medicine may increase your risk of developing gallstones. Call your doctor right away if you have severe stomach pain with nausea and vomiting after receiving this medicine.

This medicine may cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). You should check your blood sugar more often while taking this medicine and then on a regular basis.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

  1. Abdominal or stomach pain
  2. blurred vision
  3. constipation
  4. depressed mood
  5. dizziness
  6. dry mouth
  7. dry skin and hair
  8. fainting
  9. fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat
  10. feeling cold
  11. flushed, dry skin
  12. fruit-like breath odor
  13. hair loss
  14. hoarseness or husky voice
  15. increased hunger
  16. increased thirst
  17. increased urination
  18. muscle cramps and stiffness
  19. nausea
  20. severe stomach pain with nausea and vomiting
  21. sweating
  22. troubled breathing
  23. unexplained weight loss
  24. unusual tiredness or weakness
  25. vomiting
  26. weight gain

Less common or rare

  1. Abdominal or stomach bloating
  2. anxious feeling
  3. behavior change similar to drunkenness
  4. changes in menstrual periods
  5. cold sweats
  6. confusion
  7. convulsions (seizures)
  8. cool, pale skin
  9. decreased sexual ability in males
  10. difficulty with concentrating
  11. drowsiness
  12. headache
  13. loss of appetite
  14. muscle cramps and stiffness
  15. nightmares
  16. restless sleep
  17. shakiness
  18. slurred speech
  19. swelling of the front part of the neck
  20. tiredness
  21. troubled breathing (rapid and deep)
  22. unconsciousness
  23. unusual thirst

Incidence not known

  1. Black, tarry stools
  2. bleeding gums
  3. blood in the urine or stools
  4. chills
  5. darkened urine
  6. fever
  7. indigestion
  8. pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  9. pinpoint red spots on the skin
  10. severe constipation
  11. unusual bleeding or bruising
  12. yellow eyes or skin

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose

  1. Abdominal or stomach discomfort
  2. decreased appetite
  3. diarrhea
  4. dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  5. fast, shallow breathing
  6. feeling of warmth
  7. general feeling of discomfort
  8. light-colored stools
  9. muscle pain or cramping
  10. no blood pressure or pulse
  11. redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  12. shortness of breath
  13. sleepiness
  14. stopping of heart
  15. unusual drowsiness, dullness, tiredness, weakness, or feeling of sluggishness
  16. upper right abdominal or stomach pain
  17. weakness
  18. weight loss

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Pain, redness, stinging, swelling, tingling, or burning sensation at the injection site
  2. passing of gas

Less common or rare

  1. Backache
  2. bladder pain
  3. cloudy urine
  4. cough
  5. difficult, burning, or painful urination
  6. disturbed color perception
  7. double vision
  8. frequent urge to urinate
  9. frequent urination usually with very small amounts of urine
  10. general feeling of discomfort or illness
  11. halos around lights
  12. itching skin
  13. joint pain
  14. lack of appetite
  15. loss of vision
  16. lower back or side pain
  17. muscle aches and pains
  18. night blindness
  19. overbright appearance of lights
  20. runny nose
  21. shivering
  22. sore throat
  23. stools that float, are foul smelling, and fatty in appearance
  24. trouble concentrating
  25. trouble sleeping
  26. tunnel vision

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.