Precautions

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

Do not smoke during treatment with nicotine gum, lozenges, or patches because of the risk of nicotine overdose.

Nicotine should not be used in pregnancy. If there is a possibility you might become pregnant, you may want to use some type of birth control. If you think you may have become pregnant, stop using this medicine immediately and check with your doctor.

Nicotine products must be kept out of the reach of children and pets. Even nicotine patches that have been used still contain enough nicotine to cause problems in children. If a child chews or swallows one or more pieces of nicotine gum or lozenges, contact your doctor or poison control center at once. If a child puts on a nicotine patch or plays with a patch that is out of the sealed pouch, take it away from the child and contact your doctor or poison control center at once.

For patients using the chewing gum:

  • Do not chew more than 24 pieces of gum a day. Chewing too many pieces may be harmful because of the risk of overdose.
  • Do not use nicotine gum for longer than 12 weeks. To do so may result in physical dependence on the nicotine. If you feel the need to continue using the gum after 12 weeks, contact your doctor.
  • If the gum sticks to your dental work, stop using it and check with your medical doctor or dentist. Dentures or other dental work may be damaged because nicotine gum is stickier and harder to chew than ordinary gum.

For patients using the lozenges:

  • Do not use more than 20 lozenges a day. Sucking too many pieces may be harmful because of the risk of overdose.
  • Do not use nicotine lozenges for longer than 12 weeks. If you feel the need to continue using the lozenges after 12 weeks, contact your doctor.

For patients using the transdermal system (skin patch) :

  • Mild itching, burning, or tingling may occur when the patch is first applied, and should go away within 24 hours. After a patch is removed, the skin underneath it may be red. It should not remain red for more than a day. If you get a skin rash from the patch, or if the skin becomes swollen or very red, call your doctor. Do not put on a new patch. If you become allergic to the nicotine in the patch, you could get sick from using cigarettes or other products that contain nicotine.
  • Do not use nicotine patches for longer than 12 weeks if you have stopped smoking. If you feel the need to continue using nicotine patches after 12 weeks, contact your doctor.
  • The patch may cause skin burns when used during a procedure called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To prevent skin burns, make sure the patch is removed before having an MRI .